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PDF The Lords Prayer [with linked Table of Contents]

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Changes in Perspective………………………………………………………………………… 1. Increasing Involvement in the Body of Christ……………………………………… 3. Non-Hierarchical Paradigm for Christian Leadership…………………………. Foundational Teaching on Leadership Among Us………………………… 8.

Table of Contents — Go to Heaven Now!

Building Understanding On the Teachings of Jesus……………………………… 7. Three Misleadingly Translated Words………………………………………….. The Fear of The Lord………………………………………………………………………… The Fear of the Lord is the Beginning of Wisdom……………………………… Positions in the Church and Leadership Roles…………………………….. First in the church………………………………………………………………………………. The Body of Christ…………………………………………………………………………….. Slaves of Christ…………………………………………………………………… The Example of Christ………………………………………………………………………..


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  • Harrison Town: Discovering Gods Grace in Bears, Prayers, and County Fairs.

The Mongolian Church Planting Movement……………………………………. What is Hindering Growth? Growth by Multiplication, Not Simply Addition……………………………….

The Lord's Prayer - Hillsong Worship

Consequences of Exaggerating the Role of One Leader…………………… With that confidence, that kind of unchildish dependence, we're actually free. We know that there is a relationship that nothing can break. And again, you could turn to Saint Paul on that to the end of chapter eight of his Letter to the Romans: And to begin that prayer "Our Father" is really to say what Saint Paul is saying. Just as in the old hymn, here is an anchor that keeps the soul.

Here is the anchorage that keeps us steady in this turbulent, difficult, nightmare world. So the Lord's Prayer is a prayer that is utterly serious about the danger, the tragedy of the world. It's not an easy prayer. It's not a prayer that pretends and it's also a prayer that requires our lives change.

It requires that we become different sorts of people, but it acknowledges that that will only happen when we learn how to depend freely and lovingly on the God whose made himself Our Father. It's an interesting question whether the Lord's Prayer is about us. I'd say in a sense it's about all human beings.

It's about what it's like to be a human being: Give us this day our daily bread. When I pray those those bits of the Lord's Prayer, I think not just of myself or of fellow Christians, I feel I'm praying it for all human beings: Give all of us what we need for life, the dignity and the hope. Keep all of us from being plunged into crisis we can't handle. Save all of us from the destructive power of evil. So I'd be very reluctant to see it simply as a prayer only about Christians, although it is a prayer for Christians because it begins with the words "Our Father".

But as we go deeper into it, we see more fully that it's a prayer about our human condition. Every single bit of the Lord's Prayer is radical because every single bit of it challenges our assumptions about who we are and who God is and what the world is like. And what it's praying for, and again this is something we forget because we use it so often, what it's praying for is the most revolutionary change you can imagine in the world we live in.

A change to a situation where what God wants can happen, to a situation where all the hungry are fed, to a situation where forgiveness is the first imperative in all our relationships. And, as people will notice, that's not exactly like the world we inhabit at the moment. So if radical means looking for change from the roots up, yes, then it's radical. Jesus knew how to compose prayers and stories that that were memorable.


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And if you put the Lord's Prayer back into Jesus' own language of Aramaic then the rhythm and even the rhyme of the words come through very clearly. So he's teaching an easily memorable form of words, an easily memorable form of prayer. So it's meant to be transmitted, it's meant to be passed on, learned and taught. When Jesus first teaches the prayer he says when you pray say "Our Father".

So there is a very simple instruction there: But of course what the prayer does is to give us a kind of template for other sorts of prayer; it tells us that Christian prayer is always addressed to The Father. It's always prayed from where Jesus stands. All prayer has to be like that for Christians. So it's not so much that there would be other ways of saying it, we say those words simply because Jesus told us to.

But from that prayer we can get a model, an inspiration for the nature of all the prayers we ever offer. The prayer is often introduced in the worship of the church with the words "as our saviour Christ has taught us, we are bold to say", or "we dare to say" - we have the nerve to say "Our Father". We need to remember that it's a bold form of address to God. And Jesus has given us the nerve to call God Father and you sometimes hear it introduced as "as our saviour has taught us we take heart and say ", we sort of summon our strength and resource and, yes, we have the confidence to say these words.

If you take the Lord's Prayer bit by bit, there's probably not a great deal that you wouldn't find somewhere in the Old Testament or in Jewish prayers. But what's absolutely unique about it is that it begins simply with the address "Our Father", nothing else. Nothing more elaborate, nothing more grand, but just that address as to the father of the family.

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So the really distinctive thing is that all the bits of the Lord's Prayer are put in that context. This is the prayer of God's family. This is the prayer which you address to God in the most intimate of terms, not telling him how wonderful he is, not grovelling in any way before him, but just coming with complete confidence. And that must have sounded quite strange and quite, quite shocking to some people in Jesus' own day. In fact the one thing that everybody seems to have remembered about Jesus' own prayers is that he called God "Father", "Abba", the familiar, the intimate word in his own language.

When Jesus talks about "fathers" and "children" he gives us quite a resourceful picture of relationships. Think of the story of the prodigal son The son who stays at home actually never really grows up. The son who goes on adventures away, makes mistakes, learns, says "sorry", comes back, somehow does grow up. He's a grown up child of the father. And Jesus' teaching and the teaching of Saint Paul tell us that to depend on God completely as Father is not to be stuck in a childish helplessness. It's to be able to take risks, knowing that the Father will always be there to forgive and give you new beginnings.

And that's how we grow up.

The Lord's Prayer

That's how we become real adults. And I don't think either Jesus or Saint Paul or anybody else in the New Testament wants us to be childish in our relationship. And Jesus' own life is the measure of that. He's completely dependent on God, and yet he's as free as anybody could be imagined to be.

Free to take risks, to face suffering and death because the Father is there, so "Father" is also what he says on the cross. And when the words "Our Father" are said we ought perhaps to think of that little Resurrection incident where Jesus says to a close friend and follower, the relationship I have with God can be your relationship with God as well. You and I form a We together before God. And so as soon as you've said the first words Our Father you've said: I've been given a share in Jesus' relationship with God. I don't have to work out my relationship with God from scratch. I don't have to climb a long long ladder up to heaven, I've been invited into this family relationship and that's the gift that every prayer begins with.

So the very words we start with tell us a huge amount about who we are as Christians, about our Christian doctrine and belief. When we go on to say "who art in heaven", we're saying Heaven, God's place, God's home is also our home. And the kind of relationship that exists in God's presence in heaven is a relationship of love and trust and intimacy and praise that can be ours here and now. Short, simple words, and yet they tell us that heaven is here on earth because of Jesus, and into that we can enter.

But I want to see it against the background of the Old Testament's idea that the name of God is something in itself immensely beautiful and powerful. The name of God is God's word, God's presence. And to ask that God's name be hallowed, that God's name be looked upon as holy, is to ask that in the world people will understand the presence of God among them with awe and reverence, and will not use the name or the idea of God as a kind of weapon to put other people down, or as a sort of magic to make themselves feel safe.

But rather approach the idea of God, the name of God, the word of God, with the veneration and humility that's demanded. In the Jewish texts of Jesus' own day, the commandment about not taking God's name in the vain, from the Ten Commandments, is often understood as uniting the name of God with a curse - using the name of God as a kind of magic word - and that's to trivialise the name of God, it's to bring it down to our level, to try and make God a tool for our purposes.

So "Hallowed be thy name" means: The Kingdom is not a place or a system; it's just a state of affairs when God is in charge.

It's the kingship of God if you like. It's the state in which God really is acknowledged to be directing and giving meaning to everything. So we pray "God's Kingdom come", meaning let the world be transparent to God, let God's will and purpose and God's nature show through in every state of affairs , because that's what it is for God to be King.