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There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Antiquated language, yet timeless concepts. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. This book is not what I expected though that is not a bad thing. Since I knew nothing about the author, the book, or the time period in which it was written, I went into it hoping for some tips and techniques for condensing my busy life into a more manageable set of proceedings It is worth noting, at this point, that the writing format, language, and so forth, could be off-putting to a vast number of readers.

I strongly urge anyone attempting to read this book, to put every effort that you can into looking beyond those aspects of the writing, and instead focus on extracting the true essence of what is being communicated, which I will outline below. As I mentioned, it is imperative to understand what this book is not: It is not "How to stuff your busy life into 24 hours. You have 24 hours a day, and no more, for your entire life. It is advised that you spend as much of that time as possible, doing things which will cause you to constantly grow and expand in every area of your life. Examples of those activities would be anything that is generally unquestioned by the masses, that is mindless, that causes no increase in the quality of one's life other than to expend time for pleasure in the moment not to say that all such things are bad.

But when someone basically spends their entire life in that way, and does not grow as a human, touch up on their true potential, and strive for more purpose, therein lies the danger. That is where an ever-prevent, disconcerting, nagging feeling will haunt a person. And this, if forever ignored, will probably lead to a life fraught with dissatisfaction, and unbearable pain at a later time, when one realizes the mistakes they made by not utilizing their time wisely. I can confidently say that this book has the potential to be a life-changing, and paradigm-shifting, dose of knowledge to a large majority of people if only they would be open to receive it with thoughtful consideration, as opposed to the dismissive, fast-thinking mindset of the masses.

It would be a shame for anyone to overlook this book and its principles, either due to the language, approach of the author, antiquated examples, or negative reviews by other readers. Despite all of this, I cannot say that I derived much value from it, simply because it is nothing new to me, as I have already been living the overall principles of the book with boundless benefits as a result, as touted by the author , for the past 2 years of my life - and to a more extreme degree than is suggested by the author which I think is necessary in this more modern and outrageously busy, distracting age.

I will honestly admit that I've fallen into some of the traps that the author cautions against, and I battle those quite often. Namely, being extremely fervent in my discipline of how I use my time, to the point that I am stressing myself out constantly, never satisfied with what I accomplish in the time I have.

I have far too many goals, take on too much at one time, and have unrealistic expectations for the time frame needed to reach those goals.

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It is a struggle which I am attempting to overcome currently. I suspect that redirecting some of my time to reflect more also suggested by the author , could aid in doing this, despite it sounding counter-intuitive. People are free to live as they wish the author even states that one should mind their own business , but still, at the risk of sounding pompous, and like a "prig," as the author also cautions against, I will just say that one of the best decisions that I've ever made in my life, aside from creating clear, life goals, was to cut out time-wasting activities such as television, movies, video games, and so forth.

These are extremely detrimental addictions, consuming the lives of many people; if only they could see it and instead utilize the time to step into the greatness which lies within them. Everyone is special, powerful, gifted, and deserve to experience a rich and fulfilling life of purpose. Anyway, now I am focusing all of my free time on the pursuit of knowledge, and taking constant actions on goals. I've never been happier, and I've accomplished more, and of more value, in the past two years, than in the previous 32 years. People are free to feel offended by my comments, but I think if they would actually try such an extreme change, for one month, they would quickly change their view, and never look back.

Go against the crowd, think for yourself, be yourself, and set out on a journey of exploration and achievement! I wish I'd read this book 13 years ago and I'd if I should argue my teenage mind wouldn't tolerate it, I sell wish I'd read it 8 years ago. The author has am interesting sense of humor.

I laughed plenty of times reading this. But the purpose of this book isn't to entertain. I started out thinking it would help me with time management and I ended up with an immense amount of knowledge. The kind you gain from philosophy but in this case, the hard shell had been cracked and what I have is the nut I need. I think every high school great should read this. The earlier the better. Same applies to college grads and if you're far removed from college, it's not too late. I still feel it's not too late for me so it shouldn't be for you.

This book would change your mentality, and how you think about what constitutes a day. It will also change your perception. The author write in a time where political correctness was nonexistent so he says it like it is - without great nor shame. I love it when he says I stand by what I say. I've also downloaded books by epitectus and Marcus A.

As a result of freshly this and I've gotten several other titles as well. Flowery and funny self-help from the turn of the last century, this little book was an uncanny, spot-on description of my daily routine and how I often think of it. It was slightly shocking to hear my modern quotidian hang-ups called out by a guy addressing "clerks" in a time of cent round-trip train tickets, since I tend to think of them as my personal hang-ups. As in, they're my cross to bear and no one else could possibly understand, yadda yadda yadda. It was pleasantly deflating to be sh Flowery and funny self-help from the turn of the last century, this little book was an uncanny, spot-on description of my daily routine and how I often think of it.

It was pleasantly deflating to be shown in no uncertain terms that my problems weren't new. Some of my favorite quotes: If a man standing on the edge of a swimming-bath and wanting to jump into the cold water should ask you, 'How do I begin to jump? Take hold of your nerves and jump. It isn't content till it perspires. And then, too often, when it feels the perspiration on its brow, it wearies all of a sudden and dies, without even putting itself to the trouble of saying, 'I've had enough of this. Mar 09, Dan Tasse rated it really liked it Shelves: This guy is quite a baller.

My dear sir, I respect you more and more. But also, he's an example that proves that this "lifestyle design" or even "time management" stuff wasn't born yesterday. He's writing this for the common middle-class you or me, who wishes to "accomplish This guy is quite a baller. He's writing this for the common middle-class you or me, who wishes to "accomplish something outside [his] formal programme.

Literature if you like poetry, not novels ; other arts if you don't; or just a sense of in-depth knowledge and wonder in all things. The whole thing smacks of being very English: You will not have gone ten yards before your mind has skipped away under your very eyes and is larking round the corner with another subject.

Bring it back by the scruff of the neck. Ere you have reached the station you will have brought it back about forty times. Well, better than most Englishness, which doesn't even have the jelly. How to live on 24 hours a day?! I had always thought 24 hours in a day are never enough to do everything I want to do. Oftentimes I wished that a day extended to at least 34 hours. The dilemma between the wants and the needs is always a strenuous battle. But Arnold Bennett managed to pacify and console my soul. Written years ago!!!

Now that defines a classic! To live is what Bennett teaches us. To LIVE is what we are after — and not simply to exist. This self-help time management guru offers practical and wise steps to earn the real treasure in life — and he is referring to time — not money. When one reflects, one perceives that money is just about the commonest thing there is. The thought of it is simply beautiful! Dec 31, Ina Cawl rated it really liked it.

In this book, Bennett urges hourly workers to use "spare" time to improve their lives, making the best of their time outside of work. He understands that most people are spending as much time as possible working to make more money, thus disliking their lives. Jun 06, Tisha rated it it was amazing. I thought of the question one day, and lo and behold, such a book exists. I wouldn't call it a masterpice, but the writing is something I could enjoy and rely on over and over again. It gives some very practical advice, reproaches and warnings when tackling this endeavor that many people come short of achieving all the time--optimally spending one's time.

It's also very fun for me to glean the norms of the time when this was written. For those who have not read it, I will start you off with this: He suggests a way to start slow. He warns you of your human nature. And an interesting one he told me, if I am the sort that sincerely enjoys literature and doesn't just think it a worthy pursuit according to someone else, then I must make time to reflect on the book otherwise I am just consuming words and not digesting the value. I always think there is not enough time to read all the books I want to read so I burn through them, but taking time to fully ponder and discuss them is also part of finishing a book.

Nov 04, Tricia rated it liked it Shelves: You might expect from the title that this book will be some kind of time management tome, but it is anything but that. The author is intent on making sure that people 'live' rather than merely 'exist'. He proposes just one method for this 'living': Some of his advice may seem archaic, and yet it is still quite relevant today.

In this age of mindless entertainment, it may be even more important to make an active decision in You might expect from the title that this book will be some kind of time management tome, but it is anything but that. In this age of mindless entertainment, it may be even more important to make an active decision in how to use your daily allotment of hours. Feb 01, Eli rated it really liked it. How to Live on 24 Hours a Day, a very short work, or perhaps more appropriately called a pamphlet , by Arnold Bennett, insists on the very high importance of living to the fullest, constantly and with all expedience.

It is not a time-management guide, as the length and title would suggest , but more of a brief examination of the importance of truly living, as opposed to mere monotonous and melancholy existence. General aims, and the means to employ them are suggested, and the author, whom I h How to Live on 24 Hours a Day, a very short work, or perhaps more appropriately called a pamphlet , by Arnold Bennett, insists on the very high importance of living to the fullest, constantly and with all expedience.

General aims, and the means to employ them are suggested, and the author, whom I have grown to admire , has a curt and tact way of asserting himself and what he has to say. It is surprising to note that a problem which I had thought only seriously prevalent in today's world of endless, and usually mindless , electronic stimulation, that of a habitual and perpetual laziness from which follows an endless dissatisfaction with lack of accomplishment, existed in the pre-electronic world.

Granted telephones, and possibly radios, would have been fairly common in , it is practically nothing in comparison to today. I suppose this is one element of humanity that hasn't changed in a century. The work starts with noting the preciousness of time; how it is a gift, a gloriously beautiful one , and it is entirely taken for granted.

How we have a constant and steady supply of it, entirely unmolested in the future. He then proceeds to say, and he personifies a skeleton, pointing his finger at us in a tone of mockery , that all people are dissatisfied with their use of this so precious gift. That one who wishes to go to Mecca and never leaves Brixton lives with the perpetual torment of lack of accomplishment, and is worse off than the man who died along the rough trail. Any finite amount of accomplishment would only recognize a lack of a greater amount of it, and thus, the author proposes, we must learn to live with it.

To always live, and enjoy living, accomplishing what we may, inspecting life with a childish curiosity and joy, and yet, be content with the fact that we will never satisfy ourselves with our accomplishments. Ardour in well-doing is a misleading and treacherous thing. It cries out loudly for employment; you can't satisfy it at first; it wants more and more; it is eager to move mountains and divert the course of rivers. And then, too often, when it feels the perspiration on its brow, it wearies all of a sudden and dies, without even putting itself to the trouble of saying, "I've had enough of this.

Constantly, you should be 'alive', not merely existing; not vegetating. Consider the last paragraph. To be alive does not at all mean incessant advancement towards accomplishment, as that is not a source of life, though it should be a product of it , but rather, to do something of value and to enjoy doing it.

All too often do we sit idly by as the great gift of time constantly presents itself, while we, with discomfort, refuse it, and prefer to maintain a state of hypnotic stupor over engaging vivacity. Bennett warns us not to be too ambitious in our attempt to live, fail, and revert to our prior state of sleepy existence.

He cautions us to remember human nature, to allow room for failure and mistake. What a magnanimous change of direction it is to transform your entire life from a state of passivity to active, strenuous living! Always try hard, allow room for failure, and when it does show its face, for it can never be entirely killed, but it can be reduced , do not drop your whole endeavor, do not shame yourself, for failure is quite natural , make note of how that particular instance could be avoided, pick yourself up again, and keep at it.

So far the narrative covers the importance of true living, the unfortunate state of its rarity, and the emphasis we must make to do so. The following chapters concern how it is to be done. This section, I believe, is very important, and due to it being so short, is worth careful review, note and meditation, to fully digested. It is asserted that life begins with the control of your mind. He says that this is entirely possible, despite popular belief, perhaps more so in his day than in ours , and even simple.

All that is needed is constant persistence. Mind control is the first element of a full existence. He instructs us to merely, even in the course of our daily business, such as "on the train to work" or its modern equivalent , to merely focus on something be it a book, idea, something you are looking at, or whatever else , ponder it and do not be distracted.

When you are, merely redirect your focus, and resume. Beyond this, regular persistence is the only key to success. Another emphasis is quiet reflection. More specifically, and I think this to be a brilliant practical definition of 'reflection', which is so vague and arbitrarily used in most cases - to study one's self in the form of reviewing how our conduct aligns to our principles, and to the share of our actions that were well guided by reason. I paraphrase, but with the review of this passage of text, I can confidently say this is what was communicated, just more concise.

It is also encouraged to consider what one read the previous day during this time of reflection. For reading alone is almost pointless if we do not thoroughly consider its value and implications on our life.


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Oh, how we might learn and benefit from this, and yet it is so often ignored! How our lives might be so wisely guided! Following this, and thus the transition from the previous 'phase' to the present , it is encouraged to take interest in the arts, literature, and for those who dislike both, life itself, or whatever you fancy. This section seems less essential than the previous, and I think not so quite as applicable.

Although this does not at all necessarily mean an appreciation of the cliche way in which one might say that. This could very well apply to any thing or practice, thoroughly examined and appreciated. Golfing, sailing, music, painting, or what have you.


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Learn about them, examine them, appreciate them, enjoy them. To do this is to cultivate a growing interest in, and satisfaction from, art. I apologize for my summation of this being reduced to simple imperatives, but this is clearly what the author is saying. Is there not so much beauty overlooked in so many things? Is not the hand of God so visible? As it concerns reading, it is emphasized that poetry is the 'highest form of writing', which I would disagree with, herein lies some of the subjectivity , and beyond that history and philosophy, which I would accredit to the highest value of the written world.

No guide as to how to go about doing this is given, merely the emphasis to do so. He then goes on to say that nothing in life is "humdrum", that all things follow the universal Law of Causation. All things can be enjoyed and examined through this lens, that all effects have a cause, and that they themselves are a cause.

Virtually anything can be learned from through this lens, except logic and free will, and thus this nullifies the statement that something is pointless, "humdrum" or boring. It is concluded by a series of warnings. The fist of which is important to know, heed, and take to heart, to not become a snobby, know-it-all brat. You will have no positive relations with anyone except your own admiring reflection. Secondly is to note that you should maintain your routine, or 'programme' , and not worship as an object of religion, or give it so much priority that you cease to do other things of importance, such as visiting a friend who comes to town and lives miles away, or such.

Effort and regularity are what your routine should be constituted of, not obsessive adherence to. It is even noted that you will defeat your own ends by thinking about your routine, and not what it is constitutes. If in the process of doing your 'step 1', all you are thinking about is your timing in relation to 'step 2', then step one would have been entirely wasted.

He also says not to try to go from one to the next with hurried impatience and too much attention to your effort, and not on that which you are doing. The author lays out a rather vague timetable as to when these suggestions ought to be done, basing them off of the typical workday of a middle-class office worker in London at the height of the Victorian Era. Due to this, it will suffer more in my review. Life, being common to all who exist, ought not to be so confined. Granted, I don't expect him to not write and give examples from the perspective of his era, but honestly, he tells us to "do such and such as you are on your train to work The positive review comes only from the message imbued, and its general aims in achieving it, not his particular, "this ought to be done on the train etc.

It indeed causes the message to suffer, and thus, I have to chip a star off of the otherwise five star message and implication of this work. Along with this necessitating that the fifth star be withheld, is that there was much to be said that wasn't, and what was may have been quite incomplete. I do appreciate the "short and sweet" essence to it, but something so serious as living life to its fullest ought to be given more attention. More could have been said of what 'living on 24 hours a day' would look like in detail, more examples of the right ways of doing something, nothing was said of work or even the weekends , except for that the suggested 'three hours in the evening' would add zest and enrichment to the entire day.

In fact, all that is covered is this three hour session! Even for these three hours were not seriously instructed as to what specifically we ought to do other than, "read" "reflect" etc. How exactly ought we to read and reflect beyond the basic implications of what is said? Notwithstanding, even though these two things are of immense value, there is much, much more to life than merely reading and reflecting, and the book certainly could have covered what it did cover more thoroughly, and much more could have been said.

Howbeit, the message that it does convey is of such great importance that this easily deserves four stars. A positive point would be the matter-of-fact, curt manner of speaking in which the author employs his message. It does make it easier to follow, and I absolutely appreciate that it isn't written with the frilly, weenie sort of means, which tolerates anything and everything.

It's more of a "get off your ass and start living! I know it's SO hard, but you've got to try. It's okay, just keep at it". What little is said, and not enough , is communicated well. Considering that it would take you perhaps an hour to read this, I would absolutely encourage you to do so, and heed what it says! This certainly a worthy use of your time, and not a pathetic joke like so many widely-read books of today are.

Apr 22, Kirsty rated it liked it Shelves: I do not tend to read much philosophy, and largely steer away from self-help books or those on "mindfulness", but Arnold Bennett's How to Live on Twenty-Four Hours a Day looked as though it was worth a read. This piece, comprised of twelve different short essays, comes complete with rather a long preface, which Bennett stresses should be read at the end of the book.

I enjoyed Bennett's prose style; it felt chatty, wise, and intelligent. How to Live on Twenty-Four Hours a Day is primarily about ho I do not tend to read much philosophy, and largely steer away from self-help books or those on "mindfulness", but Arnold Bennett's How to Live on Twenty-Four Hours a Day looked as though it was worth a read. How to Live on Twenty-Four Hours a Day is primarily about how to make the most of one's time, and tips for how to stop putting things off and to start getting on with them.

Mildly amusing and quite enjoyable, How to Live on Twenty-Four Hours a Day is rather a short, but memorable book, which offers some respite from our chaotic world. Mar 31, Abhijeet Jain rated it really liked it Shelves: At the start, I felt that the tone of the writer is far different than what I am used to reading, after few pages I started loving the book, only after which I googled about it! As the name says, the book teaches you how to live with satisfaction.

I have read several self-help books, most of them share more or less the sa Rating: I have read several self-help books, most of them share more or less the same ideas, but this book is original, It made me ponder over my lifestyle, It told me things I never thought about. I loved the way author communicated with the readers. This book is quite short too, I recommend everyone to read it!

Below are my favourite quotes from the book You have to live on this twenty-four hours of daily time. Out of it, you have to spin health, pleasure, money, content, respect, and the evolution of your immortal soul. We never shall have any more time. We have, and we have always had, all the time there is. Beware of undertaking too much at the start. Be content with quite a little. Allow for human nature, especially your own.

This book is not amazing, in fact the advice it offers is often outdated and not even applicable in a world where work, study, fun and even love evolve online. What was amazing, however, was the deep sense of comfort and understanding it gave me. I simply love Bennett in a strange, religious kind of way. He sounds so soothing and wise to me, I could follow him to the end of the world and never doubt a word of his.

How to Live on 24 Hours a Day

Or maybe it is just that he somehow manages to articulate many things I feel insid This book is not amazing, in fact the advice it offers is often outdated and not even applicable in a world where work, study, fun and even love evolve online. Or maybe it is just that he somehow manages to articulate many things I feel inside. Like this one for example: Jul 06, Sunny rated it it was amazing Shelves: I thought this was excellent.

Little over hundred pages long and you can finish it in one sitting. It was written in the early s and the message is still very very relevant today. Arnold Bennett tries to show you how to make the most of the day that you have and focus. I agree with a lot of what he says here because I would like to think that I live by the mentality also.

Time is not money. Time is God to many. To waste away your hours watching Game of Goats or playing fishing games like C. D is baffling to me. How can we not embrace it? Starting early is critical. The only thing that you are able to waste is the here in now and the present moment you are in at this point in time which is important to understand.

Every day is the beginning of potentially hundreds of days of opportunities in which you can make fundamental differences. He urges us NOT to read newspapers in this time. He reads papers daily but in snippets and moments that he has free — not that important train journey in in which more challenging materials can be read about and thought over.

As we get older he believes we should dedicate one day to rest in the week where we can put into perspective what needs to be done and how we should do it.