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e-book Law School Property Law: The Study Guides, Outlines, and Advice That You Need to Get an A

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This list of bulleted points clearly maps out the direction of the chapter, covering all key topics. Checkpoints at the end of each chapter encourage readers to stop and review the key concepts, reiterating what has been learned. These points serve as a mechanism for double-checking knowledge. Finally, a Master Checklist at the end of each book reinforces what has been covered and helps readers identify any areas that need review or further study.

The Master Checklist is a tool for self-assessing one's mastery of the material. Nutshells are little paperback books that give a concise overview of an area of law. This series contains capsule summary outlines each section with a clear and concise explanation of legal concepts and terms, along with exam hints, strategies, mnemonics, charts, tables and study tips. Self-testing and diagnostic review questions facilitate application of legal concepts.

Also provides capsule summaries of significant cases identifying important facts, primary issues and relevant law. Essay and multiple choice questions, model answers, and detailed explanations help with exam preparation. Restatements are secondary sources that seek to create a uniform "restatement" of the legal rules that constitute the common law in a particular area.

They are written by the American Law Institute ALI , a prestigious legal organization composed of noted professors, judges and lawyers. Each Restatement consists of a set of topical volumes, which contain the actual "black letter" legal rules and drafters' commentary, and a set of Appendix volumes, which contain summaries of cases which have adopted or interpreted the Restatement rules. The Comments are written by the drafters of the Restatement to explain the provision and identify its limitations. If the provision addresses an area of law about which there is disagreement among jurisdictions, the comment will explain why the Restatement adopts one position as opposed to the other.

The "Illustrations" sections of the Restatement provide examples of how a particular Restatement provision would apply in specific factual situations. Many of these Illustrations are based on actual cases. The Understanding series is published by LexisNexis and provides an overview and analysis of legal subjects.

It provides less analysis than a hornbook but more than a nutshell. These study aids take difficult subject matter and make it accessible and easy to remember. They provide clear explanations, logical sequencing of the material, colorful acronyms, metaphor and imagery. Search this Guide Search. First Year Study Aids Study aids can be an important tool to help you succeed in law school. Online via West Academic Subscription. This study aid uses a checklist format to lead students through the questions they need to ask and answer to fully analyze the legal questions they are trying to resolve.

It presents numerous hypothetical problems and sample answers. This text covers personal jurisdiction, notice and the opportunity to be heard, subject matter jurisdiction, venue, the Erie Doctrine, pleadings,joinder of claims and parties, discovery, motions and summary judgment, Judgment as a Matter of Law and motions for a new trial, and the preclusion doctrine. Acing Constitutional Law by Russell L. Weaver; Steven Friedland Call Number: Acing Constitutional Law covers the topics typical of a first-year Con Law course, things such as judicial review, national legislative power, federal executive powers, state power to regulate commerce, intergovernmental immunities, procedural due process, substantive due process, economic rights, equal protection, freedom of expression, the Establishment Clause, the Free Exercise Clause, and state action.

Acing Contracts covers the topics typical of a first-year Contracts course, things such as offer and acceptance; consideration; statute of frauds; defenses and limits on enforceability; parol evidence and interpretation; performance; warranties; impracticability and frustration of purpose; anticipatory repudiation; material breach and substantial performance; remedies; and third party interests. Acing Criminal Law by John M. Acing Criminal Law covers the topics typical of a first-year Criminal Law course.

Acing Property by Colleen E. Acing Tort Law provides checklists for all of the topics generally covered in the basic Tort Procedure course. The final chapter, General Examination Tips, delivers important practical advice for preparing for and taking your final exam. This outline summarizes the black-letter rules of civil procedure. It covers general considerations, litigating step-by-step, authority to adjudicate, complex litigation, governing law, and former adjudication. It also contains a glossary and sample examination questions and answers. Black Letter Outlines are designed to help a law student recognize and understand the basic principles and issues of law covered in a law school course.

Thomas Dienes Call Number: This outline summarizes the black-letter rules of Constitutional Law. The Black Letter Outline series contains comprehensive outlines of particular areas of law, capsule summaries of each outline, practice examinations, and examples and review questions. Part one covers the allocation of national and state governmental power.

Part two covers individual rights and liberties and the constitutional limitations on governmental power. This outline summarizes the black-letter rules of Contracts, Outlining mutual assent; consideration; legal capacity; proper form; conditions; performance and breach; defenses; remedies; avoidance or reformation; third party beneficiaries; assignment and delegation; and more.

This outline summarizes the black-letter rules of Criminal Law. This outline covers the definition of crime; derivative defenses; collateral defenses: Bernhardt; Ann Burkhart Call Number: This outline summarizes the black-letter rules of Property Law. This Outline summarizes the basic black letter rules of Torts in a way that allows students to appreciate how different parts of their course material fit together.

This book analyzes legal procedure as part of a complicated interaction between private ordering and public intervention. It examines the overall structure of public dispute resolution through six basic concepts: Recommended in more than schools, the updated seventh edition of Concepts and Case Analysis in the Law of Contracts is a readable primer that offers first-year law students a reliable overview of the major themes and leading cases in the field of the law of contracts.

This contracts primer is straightforward and uncluttered, covering the main themes of the first-year contracts course, together with related cases. The Law of Property is organized around three main themes: Specific topics include, the law of capture, creation, adverse possession, estates and future interests, concurrent ownership, marital property, leaseholds, land transfers, recordation, easements, covenants, land use controls, and the Takings Clause, among others.

The book synthesizes these diverse topics by highlighting the overarching themes that join them together. It features property topics including a recent Supreme Court case interpreting the Takings Clause, and disputes around hydrofracking and short-term rentals like Airbnb. It has been edited to account for changes to marital property following new constitutional law on same-sex marriage. This text covers all the major cases and issues in a standard torts course. The text addresses cases and analyzes their implications, presenting the law of torts within a curricular context and covering the materials that law students are likely to encounter in a variety of courses.

This text addresses both rules and policy. Principles of Civil Procedure by Kevin M. This concise hornbook focuses on material covered in a typical law school course on civil procedure, tied to no one casebook. It provides a brief orientation; then an overview of the stages of litigation, followed by inspection of the major procedural problems governing law, authority to adjudicate, former adjudication, and complex litigation ; and finally some reflections in conclusion.

It discusses specific problems and illustrations, with the aid of diagrams and special text boxes. The book analyzes the constitutional issues studied today, and discusses the origins of judicial review and federal jurisdiction, federal commerce and spending powers, state powers in light of the dormant Commerce Clause, the war power, freedom of speech and religion, equal protection, due process, and other important individual rights and liberties. Principles of Contract Law by Robert A.

This overview of contract law explains concepts in an informal, humorous style. The footnotes cite cases, with most including short quotations to substantiate assertions made in the text. The book also contains numerous examples and illustrations.

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The text discusses the bargain theory for enforcing promises and the requirement of an agreement; additional theories for enforcing promises; Statute of Frauds; remedies; policing contracts;the Parol Evidence Rule and contract interpretation; breach; grounds for excusing performance; and third parties. Principles of Criminal Law by Wayne R. LaFave's Principles of Criminal Law: The Concise Hornbook Series provides detailed discussion on the topics of responsibility, justification and excuse, inchoate crimes and accomplice, and liability.

The book also gives attention to subjects such as causation, insanity, and conspiracy. Principles of Legal Research provides coverage of research methods and resources using both free and commercial websites as well as printed publications. It has been thoroughly updated to provide coverage of WestlawNext, Lexis Advance, Bloomberg Law, and other new resources. An introductory survey of research strategies is followed by chapters on the sources of U. Sample illustrations are included, and an appendix lists more than major treatises and looseleaf services by subject.

Online via West Academic subscription. Cases and statutory law are updated and the material reorganized; conforms with modern law school course in real property. Chapters open with brief outlines of the law encompassed within, providing an overview of rules in that area. This is followed by a series of factually-based problems designed to generate thoughts about how these rules could be applied in real life situations. In turn followed by statement of applicable law and analysis of legal issues raised, plus likely outcomes and current citations of the various laws. Principles of Tort Law by Marshall S.

This edition provides summaries on tort rationales that range from references to Kantian philosophy and a riff on Harry Potter; disusses the relation of tort law to public law; includes varied materials on consent; discusses the duty question, including a summary of a recent Supreme Court case and scholarship in the area; proides material on privacy ranging from Prosser's classification system to LGBT plaintiffs; discusses the roles of race and gender in calculations of damages; contains a criticism of "tort reform" efforts; includes case law on the "baseball rule" with respect to spectator injuries; and discusses matters of topical 'headline" interest include smartphones as distractions and certain aspects of publication of photos on the Internet.

Law Reference 2 KF This study aid provides flow charts, summaries, exam tips, short answer exam questions, multiple choice questions, and essay questions with model answers. The CrunchTime for Civil Procedure covers jurisdiction personal and subject , pleadings, discovery, choice of law Erie , trial procedure, mutli-party and multi-claim litigation, res judicata, claim preclusion, and estoppel. This CrunchTime book covers offer and acceptance, consideration, mistake, parol evidence, breach of contract, remedies, contracts involving multiple parties, warranties, and more.

This CrunchTime book covers intent, causation, culpability, inchoate attempt crimes, conspiracy, accomplice liability, crimes against the person, and crimes against property. E-Flash Cards are online flash cards for Contracts. These review consideration, formation, defenses to formation, statute of frauds, interpretation, performance, remedies, and third parties. There are eight comprehensive sample examinations included. Each exam contains 25 questions and each problem is based on recently decided federal district or appellate court decisions. Exam Pro provides the answers and a detailed analysis to enhance understanding of civil procedure.

This Exam Pro includes over objective questions covering every substantive area of Contract Law. Each answer choice includes detailed explanations as to why the correct answer was correct, and why each of the other choices was incorrect. Elements and rules for the most tested issues in Contract Law are explained in easy-to-understand, basic language, along with a step-by-step guide on how to analyze each type of question.

Also included are tips on how to best use practice multiple choice questions to prepare for graded exams, and selected explanations of how professors construct multiple choice questions and how to avoid common "distracters. This Exam Pro consists of essay questions actually given by Contracts professors throughout the United States. Every question contains a detailed explanation, along with analytical steps explained in easy-to-understand, basic language, and a step-by-step guide on how to analyze each major issue.

Both Professor "model" answers and student "actual" answers are provided. This study aid contains more than multiple-choice questions, some of which focus on specific subject areas, and some of which are mixed together in practice exams covering multiple topics. Together, these questions survey most of the material covered in a typical criminal law course. Each question is accompanied by a detailed and thorough explanation of what is the correct answer to each of these questions, and what is not. This title contains more than one hundred essay questions, some of which focus on specific subject areas, and some of which examine a number of interwoven topics.

Together, these questions survey all of the material covered in a typical criminal law course. Each question is accompanied by a comprehensive model answer that can be used to foster a deeper understanding of criminal law, and to show students exactly how to apply the rules they learned in class on an actual exam. This study aid contains multiple-choice questions, some of which focus on specific subject areas, and some of which are mixed together in practice exams covering multiple topics.


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This Exam Pro includes over objective questions on Property Law. This series offers sample exams and answers with analysis. Exam Pro provides the answers and a detailed analysis to enhance understanding of torts. This study aid provides introductions to the principles of civil procedure, together with examples that illustrate how these principles apply in typical cases. Clear introductions and explanations cover all aspects of the first-year course including the areas of res judicata, collateral estoppel, personal and subject matter jurisdiction, and three chapters on various aspects of the Erie doctrine.

This is a problem-oriented guide to the principle doctrines of Constitutional law as covered in the typical course. This text walks the student through the provisions that protect individual rights. It combines textual material with well-written and comprehensive examples, explanations, and questions to test the students' comprehension of the materials and provide practice in applying legal principles to fact patterns. National Power and Federalism, is a problem-oriented guide to the principle doctrines of constitutional law that are covered in the typical course.

This text walks the student through issues pertaining to the structure of our constitutional system, including judicial review, justiciability, national power, supremacy, the separation of powers and federalism, as well as some of the structural limitations that the Constitution imposes on state powers. Combines textual material with well-written and comprehensive examples, explanations, and questions to test studentsrsquo; comprehension of the materials and provide practice in applying legal principles to fact patterns. Provides treatment of the first-year contracts syllabus, written for students and designed to provide them with information, examples, and analysis of appropriate complexity and detail.

This text covers the contractual relationship, form contracts, consideration, promissory estoppel, unjust enrichment, restitution, interpretation and construction, Statute of Frauds, Parole Evidence Rule, incapacity, mistake, public policy violations, breach of contract, remedies, assignment, and more.

La Fond Call Number: Criminal Law, combines textual material with examples, explanations, and questions to test students' comprehension of the materials and provide practice in applying information to fact patterns. This study aid provides an overview of Criminal Law, together with examples that illustrate how these principles apply in typical cases.

Features coverage of subjects in eight major areas: Stinson; Elizabeth Pollman Call Number: This text uses step-by-step writing samples along with questions and explanations for each component of memos and briefs, giving students accessible information in a hands-on format. Examples and Explanations by D. Barlow Burke; Joseph A. The Law of Torts: This study aid provides an overview of Torts, together with examples that illustrate how these principles apply in typical cases.

Features coverage of intentional torts; chapters on trespass to chattels, conversion and trespass to land, false imprisonment, and intentional infliction of emotional distress; and a section on Taking a Torts Essay Exam. Generously donated by a fellow student, this nine hour audio lecture on compact disc covers subject matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction, long arm statutes, and constitutional limitations. It also discusses in rem and quasi in rem jurisdiction, service of process, venue, transfer, forum non conviens, removal, waiver, governing law, pleadings, joinder of claims, and more.

Generously donated by a fellow student, this 4 hour audio lecture covers Marbury v. Generously donated by a fellow student, this 5 hour audio lecture covers Contract Formation; Enforceability; Performance; Terms of Agreement; Third Parties; and Remedies. It includes the companion page handout in PDF format. Generously donated by a fellow student, this 6 hour Real Property audio lecture includes estates-fee simple, fee tail, life estate, co-tenancy, joint tenancy, tenancy in common, tenancy by the entirety, and the landlord-tenant relationship.

Also explained in detail are liability for condition of premises, assignment and sublease, easements, restrictive covenants, adverse possession, recording acts, conveyancing, personal property-finders, bailments, gifts, and future interests. This lecture also includes a 62 page handout in PDF format. Gilbert Law Summaries give students an outline to help prepare for exams. Students test their knowledge and fine tune exam skills with exam questions multiple choice, short answer, and essay from the back of each outline.

This text includes personal and subject matter jurisdiction. It explains the Erie doctrine and federal common law, pleadings, and parties. It also includes discovery, summary judgment, pretrial conference and settlements, trial, appeals, claim preclusion res judicata and issue preclusion collateral estoppel. Discusses the powers of federal government, including judicial power, powers of Congress, Presidential power, foreign affairs power, and intergovernmental immunities. Also included are separation of powers, regulation of foreign commerce, and regulation of interstate commerce.

It also covers taxation of interstate and foreign commerce, due process, equal protection, "state action" requirements, freedoms of speech, press, and association, and freedom of religion. This Contracts outline discusses consideration, mutual assent, defenses , third-party beneficiaries, and assignment of rights and delgation of duties. It also covers conditions, substantial performance, material v. The topics discussed in this criminal law outline are elements of crimes including actus reus, mens rea, and causation , vicarious liability, complicity in crime, criminal liability of corporations, and defenses including insanity, diminished capacity, intoxication, ignorance, and self-defense.

Also included are inchoate crimes, homicide, other crimes against the person, crimes against habitation including burglary and arson , crimes against property, offenses against the government, and offenses against the administration of justice. Students can test their knowledge and fine tune exam skills with exam questions multiple choice, short answer, and essay which are featured at the back of each outline. The topics included in this outline are reversions, possibilities of reverter, rights of entry, remainders, executory interests, and rules restricting remainders and executory interest.

Also discussed are rights of owners of future interests, construction of instruments, powers of appointment, and the rule against perpetuities, including reforms of the rule. Also covers administrative agencies including regulations, and looseleaf services , citators, computers in legal research, reading and understanding a case including briefing a case , using legal source books, and basic guidelines for legal writing.

Discusses possession including wild animals, bailments, and adverse possession , gifts and sales of personal property, freehold possessory estates, and future interests. Also included are tenancy in common, joint tenancy, and tenancy by the entirety, condominiums, cooperatives, marital property, landlord and tenant, and easements and covenants. This outline also covers nuisance, rights in airspace and water, right to support, zoning, eminent domain, sale of land, and methods of title assurance.

Covers intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, products liability, nuisance, survival of tort actions, wrongful death, and immunity. Also included are release and contribution, indemnity, workers' compensation, no-fault auto insurance, defamation, invasion of privacy, misrepresentation, injurious falsehood, interference with economic relations, and unjustifiable litigation. The Glannon Guide to Civil Procedure uses explanatory text and multiple-choice questions to review course content and show the reader how to correctly analyze and answer multiple-choice exam questions.

Developed and written by the author of Civil Procedure: The Glannon Guide to Civil Procedure provides a thorough and up-to-date course review that emphasizes multiple-choice questions and test-taking strategies. The Glannon Guide to Constitutional Law: Provides a combination explanations for each topic, multiple-choice questions, analysis, and exam-taking tips prepares students for any type of exam as it hones their understanding and application of the Constitutional Law rules.

Covers judicial power and the constitution; allocation of power in a federal system; express, implied, and reserved powers and limits; powers of congress and their limits; limits on state power to regulate interstate commerce; and separation of powers. Glannon Guide Constitutional Law: A concise, clear, and effective review of Individual Rights and Liberties topics in Constitutional Law that is organized around multiple-choice questions. Brief explanatory text about a topic is followed by one or two multiple-choice questions.

After each question, the author explains how the correct choice was identified thereby helping the student to review course content and at the same time learn how to analyze exam questions. Contracts topics are broken down into manageable pieces and are explained in a conversational tone. Chapters are interspersed with hypotheticals. Multiple-choice questions are interspersed throughout each chapter not lumped at the end to mirror the flow of a classroom lecture.

Correct and incorrect answers are carefully explained; you learn why they do or do not work. The Glannon Guide to Criminal Law is a concise, clear review of criminal law topics organized around multiple-choice questions. It includes brief explanatory text about each topic, followed by one or two multiple-choice questions.

After each question, the author explains how the correct choice was chosen and clarifies why other options were not correct. New hypotheticals feature situations involving the Model Penal Code. The Glannon Guide to Property: Learning Property Through Multiple-Choice Questions and Analysis provides a concise, clear, and effective review of property topics through the use of multiple-choice questions. After each question the author explains how the correct choice was chosen, So that students learn how to analyze exam questions while they review course material.

The Glannon Guide to Torts uses explanatory text and multiple-choice questions to thoroughly review course content. With its balance of explanatory introductions and self-testing questions. The Glannon Guide to Tort Law provides a thorough and up-to-date course review that emphasizes multiple-choice questions and test-taking strategies. High Court briefs are written to present the essential facts, issue, decision and rationale for each case in a clear, concise manner.

These briefs are followed by a useful legal analysis, which provides extra tips and contextual background about each case, connecting the case to the broader concepts being developed throughout the casebook. This book also supplies case vocabulary, which defines new or unusual legal words found throughout the cases. Finally, to enhance the reader's recall, there is a corresponding memory graphic for each brief that portrays an entertaining visual representation of the relevant facts or law of the case.

Online via the West Academic subscription. This title contains briefs for each major case in Friedenthal's casebook on Civil Procedure. The briefs will help readers identify, understand, and absorb the core knowledge points from each case. They are followed by legal analysis, providing contextual background about each case, and connecting the case to the broader concepts developed throughout the book. This title also supplies case vocabulary, with definitions of new or unusual legal words found throughout the cases.

Finally, to enhance the reader's recall, there is a corresponding memory graphic for each brief that portrays a visual representation of the relevant facts or law of the case. This title contains briefs for each major case in Marcus' casebook on Civil Procedure followed by legal analysis that provides contextual background about each case.

Finally, there is a corresponding memory graphic for each brief that portrays a visual representation of the relevant facts or law of the case. This product contains briefs for each major case in Subrin's casebook on civil procedure. High Court briefs are written to present the essential facts, issue, decision, and rationale for each case in a clear, concise manner.

The briefs are followed by a legal analysis, which provides extra tips and contextual background about each case, connecting the case to the broader concepts in the casebook. They are followed by a useful legal analysis, which provides extra tips and contextual background about each case, connecting the case to the broader concepts being developed throughout the casebook.

This title contains briefs for each major case in Farber's casebook on Constitutional Law. These briefs are followed by legal analysis, providing contextual background about each case, and connecting the case to the broader concepts developed throughout the casebook. This title contains briefs for each major case in Stone's casebook on Constitutional Law. The briefs include legal analysis, providing extra tips and contextual background about each case, and connecting the case to the broader concepts being developed throughout the casebook.

It also includes a case vocabulary defining new or unusual legal words, and a corresponding memory graphic for each brief portraying a visual representation of the relevant facts or law of the case. The briefs are followed by a useful legal analysis, which provides extra tips and contextual background about each case, connecting the case to the broader concepts being developed throughout the casebook. This title contains briefs for each major case in this casebook.

Finally, to enhance the reader's recall, there is a corresponding memory graphic for each brief that portrays an entertaining visual representation of the relevant facts or law. Fuller's High Court Case Summaries on Contracts, 9th contain briefs for each major case in this casebook. Briefs present the essential facts, issue, decision and rationale for each case in a clear, concise manner. Briefs are followed by legal analysis, which provides extra tips and contextual background about each case.

Case vocabulary is supplied, which defines new or unusual legal words in the cases. Finally, there is a corresponding memory graphic for each brief. This title contains briefs for each major case in Dressler's casebook on Criminal Law, 6th. They are followed by a useful legal analysis.

The book also supplies case vocabulary and a corresponding memory graphic for each brief, providing a visual representation of the relevant facts or law of the case. This book contains briefs for each major case in Kaplan's casebook on criminal law. These briefs are followed by a useful legal analysis, which provides extra tips and contextual background about each case, connecting the case to the broader concepts in the casebook. This title contains briefs for each major case in LaFave's casebook on Criminal Law.

Cribbet's High Court Case Summaries on Property, 9th contain briefs for each major case in this casebook. This edition contains well-prepared briefs for each major case in Dobbs's casebook on Tort Law. Case vocabulary defines new or unusual legal words in the cases. Hornbooks What Are hornbooks? Gain insight into the laws governing all of the major steps in the civil litigation process, starting with investigation and ending with post-appeal collateral attacks. This text covers the major themes underlying the governing legal standards and those basic issues that the case law and literature suggest to be the most pressing.

References to federal practice and procedure are provided with a discussion on the burden of complex, multi-party litigation on the judicial system. Constitutional Law Hornbook by John E. Hornbooks are a mini-treatise for law students. They provide a more in-depth analysis of law school subjects than the other series. This text analyzes and discusses the origins of judicial review and federal jurisdiction, sources of national authority, the growth of federal commerce and fiscal powers, and the limits on state laws that burden interstate commerce.

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It also explores and analyzes individual liberties and due process, including equal protection, freedom of speech and religion, federal powers to enforce the Bill of Rights, and limitations on the jurisdiction of federal courts. Finally, this one-volume treatise explores the separation of powers including the restrictions on the foreign affairs power and the recent cases on the war on terror. Contracts Hornbook by Joseph M. The author provides a detailed treatment of the basic rules, principles, and issues in contracts.

Topics covered include offer and acceptance, parol evidence and interpretation, consideration, promissory estoppel, contracts under seal, capacity of parties, conditions, performance, and breach. The author also discusses damages, avoidance and reformation, third-party beneficiaries, assignments, and the statute of frauds. The discharge of contracts and illegal bargains are also the subject of separate chapters.

First Year Study Aids

Criminal Law Hornbook by Wayne R. Insanity', Intoxication, Infancy; etc.

Fleming's + 2L = Vision

Moynihan's Introduction to the Law of Real Property: This hornbook presents the history of the English common law scheme of estates in land, including future interests, and the scheme's importation to the United States. It specially treats the types of interests a person can hold in land today and the associated legal rules that affect those interests. The text is peppered with many review problems to assist the reader in learning the material in the monograph.

The Law of Property by William B. This hornbook covers property laws; surveys estates in land present, future, and concurrent ; surveys comparable interests in personalty; covers landlord and tenant law; and addresses rights against neighbors and other third persons. Also examines easements and profits, running covenants, governmental controls on land use, land contracts, conveyances, titles, and recording systems. This single-volume hornbook provides a comprehensive overview of tort and injury law. The book covers all of the major topics in tort law. Topics include liability for physical injuries, as well as emotional, dignitary, and economic harms.

This newly-updated edition includes citations to hundreds of cases and statutes decided over the last decade, as well as references to the Restatement Third of Torts. Law in a Flash: This Law in a Flash set covers Civil Procedure. Part II covers parties, pleadings, pretrial motions, trials, and post-trial motions.

This Law in a Flash set covers Constitutional Law. Contracts by Steven L. This Law in a Flash set covers Contracts. Criminal Law by Christian M. This Law in a Flash set covers Criminal Law. Real Property by Steven L. This Law in a Flash set covers Real Property. Torts by Steven L. This Law in a Flash set covers Torts. Civil Procedure Stories by Kevin M. This book is a collaborative effort by fourteen law-school professors to provide a deeper understanding of the great civil procedure cases.

However, I am a true believer in the following saying: Luck is when preparation meets opportunity. I have only felt good walking out of one law school exam, and it was the one I did my best on. The rest of the exams, I usually felt somewhere between "thank God that is over" and "that wasn't that bad, and everyone else probably thought the same thing. The one thing I did have going for me was that I always walked into an exam prepared. My motto was that when a law school exam was over, I wanted to be able to look myself in the mirror and say "I did everything I could this semester to do well in the class, and whatever the grade comes out as, I can live with it.

I read the cases, worked with supplements, implemented LEEWS, attended every class, worked with study groups to go over exams, and lived and breathed law school. Was it the most healthy approach? Have people done better by doing less work? But at the end of the day, I wanted to be able to say that I gave it my best, and if my best wasn't good enough, then so be it.

At least I had given it my all. So what message should you get out of this? Do the best of your ability because that is all you can reasonably expect from yourself. You can show up to class every day and "take your professors frequency" by learning about what you prof is stressing and any exam information they give.

You can pick up your professors exams from the exam bank at the beginning of the semester and spend the entire semester figuring out what the heck your professors is looking for on test day. What you shouldn't do is worry about what anyone else is doing. To some extent, yes. In torts, I focused heavily on intentional torts and got lucky when one 90 minute essay was dedicated exclusively to intentional torts. Realize there is inherently some luck involved in law school exams and grading in general. It is tough for me to put an exact figure on the number of hours I studied, but I will say that I was an ultimate grinder.

You can, no doubt, do well with doing a lot less studying. For whatever reason, I felt guilty when I wasn't studying, and I was always under the impression that someone was working harder than me. It was unhealthy, but I got good grades, so I guess it is up to you to determine to what extreme you are willing to take things. As I said, you can do well with doing a lot less, but considering that I read and briefed all the cases in every single class using the LEEWS briefing method and worked through multiple supplements, this was something that simply couldn't be done in a short amount of time.

On a week to week basis, I always did my reading for the upcoming week during the weekend. This means that I spent probably around 8 hours per day each Saturday and Sunday reading my casebook for the upcoming week. If the class met 4 times a week, I read 3 days ahead leaving one day of reading for the week. If it was a 3 meetings a week class, I read the entire weeks assigned reading over the weekend. I had four classes in the fall and three in the spring, but I didn't break them up in any particular order.

Yes, that is a boring weekend full of homework, but it worked for me. I still kick myself for that, but that grades I received made up for it. There are a couple reasons I did this. After sitting in class and shuttling back and forth between the library, I had zero motivation to read my casebook during the week. Any reading I didn't get done on the weekend I did in between classes during the rest of the week which usually was only 1 day worth of reading for 2 classes, which would take about a total of hours.

Second, I am a big picture guy. I liked to see where the class was going, and doing reading in 3 or 4 day chunks gave me a good "big picture" view of whatever topic we were working with. Lastly, I wanted to work with supplements during the week and I knew that class participation didn't matter, so it wasn't life or death if I didn't remember all of the little facts of each case.

During the week, I attended every class only missing two classes all year for callback interviews for 1L summer positions. You will usually have a break in between your 1L classes my breaks ranged from 45 minutes to 90 minutes , and always try to do something law-related supplements, Cali lessons during those breaks save for your lunch break.

Treat it like a job where you put in your time during the day. You would be surprised how many people play grab ass and waste time during the day and then are up all night reading and doing other stuff. Also, once my last class was over, I would head to the gym for a workout, go home and eat dinner, and then spend the night working with supplements for about hours, outline, or work on Legal Writing assignments when they were due. Overall, I thought it was a solid schedule. I believe the schedule I followed on a week-to-week basis really set me up for success over the long term.

Because I put in my time every day and on the weekends, I never had to press to fit in everything at the end of the semester in terms of outlining, taking practice exams, etc. There are a couple big-picture things to keep in mind:. First, figure out when your big Legal Research assignments are due. If I had a big LRW project due, I would usually spend my nights working on it instead of working with supplements and cut out some of the casebook reading on the weekend still doing at least 2 days ahead and bumping the rest to in between classes or maybe 1 night of reading per week, if necessary.

Second, I would recommend using any breaks fall break, spring break, Thanksgiving break to outline. I took weekends off for any week long breaks that I had during the year i. I would try to spend about hours per day outlining and working through supplements over fall break and spring break. I also did not go home on Thanksgiving and spent the entire weekend from Wednesday to Sunday holed up in my apartment outlining. I did take Thanksgiving night off to eat dinner with some friends who also stayed around campus, but that was about it for breaks.

Typically, these school-sponsored breaks also coincided with natural breaks in the material i. Not having a 5 day break before finals in the spring like you have for Thanksgiving in Fall sucks in terms of having free days to outline and get stuff done, so plan accordingly. Third, make a study schedule and stick to it. The semester is a grind, and if you have get in the habit of good study techniques, these habits will be hard to break.

I have always said that both good and bad habits are hard to break, and if you get in the habit of making the most of the time that you have, things will work out more smoothly towards the end of the semester. First, I'll tackle what I think were the two most helpful supplements for me during law school: And the best part: I can't overestimate how clutch this is when you are dropping 60K per year for law school.

Your school librarian can provide you with the user password to access Cali, and, at least at my school, they also handed out CD's with all the lessons on them. There will be a lesson for most of the material you will go over in all your foundational classes, and the lessons usually range in length from 15 minutes to 2 hours. Most lessons are about 30 minutes long and are perfect to do when you have that pesky 45 minute break between classes.

I know I sound like a broken record, but when you get ZERO feedback on your progress in law school, the Cali lessons are a great way to figure out if you are learning the black letter law and are able to apply it to hypotheticals. Every question not only tells you whether you got it right or wrong, but it also provides an explanation varying in detail on why you got the question right or wrong.

Cali cites numerous cases that you will read in class, and it also cites the Restatements for torts and K's. I only had two classes where I had multiple choice on the final, but I used Cali lessons in all my classes. I have also lifted entire paragraphs out of the Cali lessons and dropped them into my final exam outlines.

The only downside to Cali lessons is that the lessons almost always cover more material on a topic than your professor will in class and that you would be expected to know on an exam. Every teacher approaches subjects in a different manner, but, in my own experience, I was able to recognize what we did and did not go over in class and adjust accordingly. The other drawback is that your professor and the professors who write the Cali lessons will often use different terminology for example, this happened in my property class for the estates and future interests portion of the class.

This can't be stressed enough. Go through these as the semester progresses to test yourself on the topics. Don't leave them all until the end although they are great for exam review. Two enthusiastic thumbs up from me. Everyone will lug these around in law school, and maybe half will crack them at some point. Most people make the mistake of waiting until the end of the year to buy supplements as "exam cram," but I found them more useful to read through as the semester went on. I found that it was best to at least outline a rough answer to each hypothetical presented, but I will admit that with the time crunch, I rarely wrote out complete answers to the questions.

I liked to read through them before doing my assigned casebook readings and then try and do the problems once I finished reading the supplement and my assigned reading not always possible to do but at least it was an aspirational goal. Also, as with the Cali lessons, be aware of different terminology that your professors might use. If you can get them for cheap online Half. Keep in mind that law school exam success requires you to go through a 2 step process:. Most people stop at 1 and don't learn how to apply it to new situations, and that is why these supplements worked for me.

They challenged me to apply the BLL to new fact situations and figure out what was applicable and why. I used the Crunchtime outlines by Emmanuels in nearly every class, and I found them superior to the larger commercial outlines. The larger commercial outlines go way more in depth than what you will cover in the foundational 1L classes, and the Crunchtime outlines present a more concise and easier to navigate supplement at least in terms of commercial outlines. I also loved the charts in each Crunchtime that walked you through the best way to analyze certain exam questions that you are certain to see parol evidence in K's, equal protection in Con Law, etc.

There were also short hypos in the book and "exam tips" which are also in the larger outlines that I always went over the night before exams. They were helpful in refreshing your memory about the entire body of law that you will have crammed in your head. The book skims on some areas of law and sacrifices some of the depth of the larger commercial outline. However, I think that coverage or lack thereof was not detrimental, at least in the classes that I took.

The book still covered pretty much everything that I covered in my classes with a few exceptions of course. Buy them used since they are too expensive to purchase new. Solid supplement all around. I used the Glannon guides in both Civ Pro thumbs up and in Property another thumbs up, although it was not written by Glannon. There are no essay questions in this book, as they are all multiple choice. It is a great way to test your knowledge of the body of law, and each multiple choice questions contains a detailed description of why each answer was right or wrong.

I used this book in Civ Pro where I had multiple choice on my final and in Property which was all essay and found the books helpful in each class.

If you don't have multiple choice questions on your final exam, you might not find these as useful. I found these books useful, but they might be overkill. Not indispensable, but definitely not worthless. You'll need to get a post version for Glannon FRCP rule change , but the old property one will do just fine.

I only used this book in Property but found that it was a good hornbook if you can call it that. The book addresses most of the major cases for the different areas of property law I found it helpful for the Con Law cases on takings, which really confused me. It also gave a concise treatment to the different theories of property helpful if you have a policy question on the final exam. It was a pretty easy read, too. There are no questions to test yourself on the doctrine and feedback is key when you use supplements.

Thus, there was no way to test yourself on the black letter law. However, if you already do the CALI lessons and some of the other supplements, this might be a non-issue. I also purchased this book for Civ Pro, but gave up because I didn't like the length and preferred Glannon.

Good way to brush up on some of the doctrine, good for property, not sure about any other class. I got my book for around 3 dollars on half. It gave great explanations for the questions, but I didn't use them in any other class. Verdict - useful in Con Law, jury is out on the other classes. If you don't have this book for Con Law, you are making a terrible life choice.

Everyone seems to know this book is solid and has it. I could have not purchased my casebook and I would have been fine reading this book. Use the table of cases in the back of the book to find the corresponding cases you are covering in class. I gave up on it halfway through the semester. Verdict - Other people swear by this book, but purchase it at your own risk. I only bought these in property, and they were great for testing myself on the BLL. They are broken down by subject area easements, takings, adverse possession, etc. I can't speak to the usefulness in other classes, but for me, they were great to go over in between classes when I had minute breaks.

Verdict - Get them used for cheap if you feel that the Cali lessons aren't making things clear for you. It is no secret that 1L takes up a huge chunk of time at least for me it did. And it's no secret that generally, when things get crunched for time, working out is usually the first thing to go. The first year of law school is a grind. It will wear you down physically and mentally. But staying in shape and working out can actually pay dividends during finals week.

When other classmates you have might be fading, you might be able to keep up your work level and maintain a high level of focus. I tried to work out 4 times per week leading up to finals, and then when finals week rolled around, I would try to fit in workouts after my finals to relieve the stress. It is an approach that I think worked well for me. It doesn't matter if it is lifting weights, running, or just walking around campus, but do something physical.

I've found that even if I am tired, working out will actually give me more energy than I would have had if I had not worked out. I had multiple classmates who put on pounds during 1L, generally looked and felt awful, and at least from my view were tired and unable to function at their best once finals rolled around. It sounds like something simple and stupid, but I truly think that working out regularly can give you a slight edge over the entire course of the 1L year. Like I've said before, habits whether good or bad are tough to break, and if you get in the habit of working out, it can, and will, pay off.

Before each season, I would sit down and write out personal goals that I wanted to achieve and then post them in my locker. Seeing those goals each day kept me focused and motivated, particularly on the days that I didn't feel like giving my best effort. Moreover, I think writing down your goals forces you to articulate what it is you want to accomplish during 1L. Do you want to make law review? Put it down on the list.

Do you want to be above the curve in each class? Put it on the list. Do you want to be prepared for each class? Putting something in writing and forcing yourself to look at everyday is a reminder of why you are in law school and what you need to do in order to get to where you want to be. There are a couple caveats with writing down your goals. First, you need a mixture of goals that can be somewhat easily accomplished such as being prepared for each class , some medium goals having outlining done before the last week of class , and difficult goals making law review or transferring.


  • Sonias Feeling Sad (Books Beyond Words).
  • The Crocodiles Teeth.
  • 1L Subject Lectures.
  • 1-L Survival Guide.
  • Netherhall Gardens!
  • If you choose goals that are too difficult to achieve such as getting the highest grade in every 1L class or finishing at the top of you 1L class , it will only cause stress and anxiety. I did this once in college and it hurt my performance. I set an individual goal that was much too difficult to reach, and everyday I had to read that goal, it made me think about how hard it was to do. In turn, I preformed at a much lower level. On the other hand, make sure that your goals are not too easy to achieve. You need to have the goal list as a reminder to push yourself everyday, and if you make your goals too easy, it will defeat the purpose of writing them down in the first place.

    Truthfully, I can't tell you what you goals you want to achieve during 1L. It might be something like getting on law review, or it might be something like getting elected as SBA rep. Both are great goals. Both are somewhat difficult to achieve. Different people have different goals.

    Whatever your goals might be, I think it is important to take some time before the school year starts and write them down. It will force you yo think about why the heck you are about to put yourself through 1L. And who knows, you might end up like me and totally exceed your goals. It is a good feeling. Table of Contents - Topic 1: Supplements - Topic 5: Commercial Outlines - Topic 6: Random 1L Advice Topic 1: Here is a list of books you should get this summer for test prep: When I would go back and outline, I could then just insert the "Tools" section into my outline since it was the BLL that I needed for the exam and delete the fact summary: For me, the following approach worked for study groups: