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This book really moved me and got under my skin at the same time. I imagine Koresch was very knowledgeable concerning the Bible and had some kind of spark that held the Davidians together. I hope now that people are more understanding and want to hear from the few who survived at Mount Carmel.

With so much division, we need to really hear and listen to the other side.

David Blunkett

And that he also listed all the Davidians who died. Thank you for giving me this insight Mr. Feb 03, Charlie Serocold rated it liked it. Only one person's perspective so potentially a little skewed. It certainly changes how you may have perceived the event: I personally thought that Koresh was a sick sociopath who had brainwashed his cult followers to commit mass suicide.

In fact, the book describes how atrociously the ATF and FBI certainly acted, and how the press and the media were quick to assume the worst. The most interesting part of the book is the first half - where the author describes why and how he joined the Davidians, Only one person's perspective so potentially a little skewed. The most interesting part of the book is the first half - where the author describes why and how he joined the Davidians, and the effect that David Koresh had on his life at the time which was, as you might expect, a little bit lost.

The reveal comes about half way through. He has a way with words and believes he is the Lamb performing the Seven Seals I didn't fully understand this part. He imposed certain community rules - the most controversial being that he did not want adults to have sex with one another, even if they were married.

He explained that he was the only one who could have sex, and he'd sleep with other men's wives.

Even worse was that he was allowed to have sex with children as young as 11 maybe even younger. This undoubtedly makes him a kind of monster, and he convinced brainwashed? It's a fairly routine cult-leader practice - abuse of power to satisfy his own, warped, desires - and once this has been called out, the book spends the rest of its time on how badly the situation was handled, citing numerous examples of how the government lied to protect itself against potential claims of its mismanagement of the affair.

I vividly remember when Waco was happening. The media and government vilified the Branch Davidians and at the time I thought it was the truth. This was definitely a sect, not a cult. The people living at Mount Carmel were free to leave if they wished. This is exactly what the Branch Davidians followed. Like the Branch Davidians were vilified by the media in the aftermath of February 28, my husband Nick was vilified in the media after he was murdered in the San Bernardino terrorist attack.

One reporter actually said he was a terrorist because of his beliefs.


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For anyone interested in religious cults and sects, and anyone who wants to see the other side of the siege at Waco I his is a must read. Jan 06, Janet Lynch rated it it was amazing Shelves: Like Warren Jeffs of the Fundamentalist Mormon Church, he raped numerous children, often with parental permission, because God told him to do it.

Male Koresh followers gave up sex and offered him their wives. In the end most of his followers were also willing to give up their lives and those of their children. The author, David Thibodeau, is one of the few survivors of the raid in Waco, Texas, on April 19, We learn why Thibodeau ended up joining the community led by David Koresh and what went on inside the compound.

Some things good, some extremely objectionable. I felt Thibodeau gave a very fair view of both sides. His last chapter in the book addresses things from both sides that might have made a big difference in the outcome of the attack. My rating of this book has nothing to The author, David Thibodeau, is one of the few survivors of the raid in Waco, Texas, on April 19, My rating of this book has nothing to do with what I think of the Davidian teachings, it is solely on this book. The book gave me a better view of what happened in and outside of Waco during that time period.

There was no inclination to reach for my standard mystery novel since I felt this was enlightening and well written. This is a quote by Rob Cline, a correspondent for the Gazette, January 8, , that sums it up: May 09, Candice rated it did not like it. I have never read a cult survivor book in which the member continues to drink the kool-aid while extolling the virtues of artificial colors between gulps. I gave this book pages worth of my time. This book was a decidedly one-sided view of the Waco story, but I felt as though the author did a good job of acknowledging his bias.

Amazing, actually, that he could be as neutral as he was. When Bill Hicks, stand-up comedian and philosopher, witnessed FBI's and other authorities' siege of the compound of the "Davidians" in Waco, Texas, he decided to go there himself. While there, he saw murderous gas being jolted into a building, along with numerous shots from several different high-calibre weapons, not to forget how tanks drove into the compound itself. Most of the persons inside of the building had either died from FBI's and other American law-enforcement authorities bullets, f When Bill Hicks, stand-up comedian and philosopher, witnessed FBI's and other authorities' siege of the compound of the "Davidians" in Waco, Texas, he decided to go there himself.

Most of the persons inside of the building had either died from FBI's and other American law-enforcement authorities bullets, fires that had started because of the extremely volatile gas, or from having the building collapse on them due to tanks entering the building. Hicks later added the following to his stand-up routine: I first started reading this book wary of it; I've read a multitude of pop-culture books, studies, monographs, research, and criminological forensics to be very tired of these kinds of tomes; most have a kind of "HE WAS A MONSTER" feeling that surrounds them, mainly as a the culprit s are mainly male and b shock tactics are used in a kind of tabloid fashion.

However, I was very glad to note that Thibodeau who is bolstered by the skills of his co-author, Leon Whiteson has produced a book which is not only an easy read, but skips the entire fire-and-brimstone thing that often, sadly, envelops sensationalistic happenings such as the mass-murder of civilians in Waco, Texas. He starts off with a highly sensoric paragraph on what the end of the Waco siege was about: Day and night booming speakers blast us with wild sounds—blaring sirens, shrieking seagulls, howling coyotes, wailing bagpipes, crying babies, the screams of strangled rabbits, crowing roosters, buzzing dental drills, off-the-hook telephone signals.

The young children and babies in our care, most under eight years old, are terrified. These torments are intended to sap our wills and compel us to surrender to an authority that refuses to accept that we are a valid religious community with deeply held beliefs. Jon Ronson, an English author, noted in his famous book "The Men Who Stare At Goats" that the US government has since long been experimenting with audio as psychological warfare, actually interviewing American generals and others who attest to these experiments becoming life during the Waco siege.

After the shattering introduction of the book, Thibodeau quickly describes his adolescence, always wanting to travel and experience things, not knowing where he stood until he found music. He became an adept drummer, left home for music school where drumming was everything, and subsequently happened to meet David Koresh, who played the guitar. Koresh is described as charismatic, with an intense knowledge of the Bible. As Thibodeau was not Christian, he was still drawn to Koresh who - according to Thibodeau - used a very non-violent way to get Thibodeau into his way of thinking; never preachy, always speaking fluently, they discussed the Bible, which Koresh interpreted via adventism, which bases a belief that armageddon is neigh.

So, Thibodeau moved to Texas, where Koresh had forged a tight-knit community of followers. After a while, Thibodeau started believing Koresh's flavour of God. The crowd, which was around one-third black, was shocked. You could cut the hush with an axe. The people I value are people of light. The New Light revelation was so radical it shocked some of his people and shook their faith. Simply put, it mandated celibacy for everyone except David. Single men in the community had to give up sex. Married men, such as Steve Schneider and Livingston Fagan, had to separate from their wives and cease making love altogether.

Sex was a distraction, David told his people, an untamed power seducing the spirit away from its focus. Only David was given the right to procreate with any of the women, married or single, to generate the inner circle of children who would rule the coming kingdom to be established in Israel. The children David would have with these women, married and single, ranging in ages from fourteen to forty, would represent the most sacred core of the community. I feel that the best and worst of Thibodeau's writings lie in how he portrays Koresh; at one point, he is obviously sucker-punched into the whole sect mentality, not questioning the totalitarian leader's claim to be "the Lamb from Revelation" which he actually made while classifying homosexual persons as "sinful"; also, women cooked, men worked on the building.

Thibodeau writes of this "jarring" him, and at the same time, anybody who has ever been subjected to and fallen for peer pressure can relate to bowing down to ideas of others even though they may feel to be utterly wrong. Whether or not Koresh raped children, even though that may not be the case according to Texan law, having sex with year-old girls is pedophilia in my eyes. And yes, Koresh obviously abused his place of power much like Charles Manson, Barack Obama, and Donald Trump have, in their autocratic and totalitarian ways.

According to Thibodaeu, Koresh and others at the top of his gang did not force people to stay at their compound. Children were apparently well looked after, people were not worked to the bone, and it seems as though Koresh was mostly an OK person apart from raping children and believing he was "the Lamb". Apart from that, just. Still, to me, the most interesting thing about this book apart from Thibodeau's personal experiences with being drawn into Koresh's being and collection of humans, is how both the FBI and the American justice system utterly perverted everything that occurred during the siege, not to mention the judicial process that followed.

To begin with, the ATF wanted to attack the compond. The basis for this deserves a full quotation: A corrupt document on its face, the affidavit served as the original act that brought about the obliteration of our community. We only got to see the sealed warrant during the siege, on March 19, weeks after the ATF attack. For the public, the warrant remained sealed until after the fire, too late for the media to examine it and question its validity.

The most blatant lie in the ATF affidavit was the drug charge. The drug charge dated back to George Roden, who had allowed speed dealers to operate in Mount Carmel during the mids. She thought it was unnecessary. Congressional hearings and other law business has clearly shown how FBI top brass lied about vital points, and evidence - for example the bullet-struck right-hand side of the compound door - has vanished from the trace of the Earth, by the way, evidence which only did the law enforcement agencies disservice.

Everyone who was allowed to see the mass-murder that was about to happen could see the obvious signs on the wall: Though Jeannine repeatedly denied this, Oprah kept pushing. It's interesting to know that the FBI called their attack plan "Jericho". It included a process to drive tear gas into the compound over 48 hours. In January the United States and other countries had signed the Chemical Weapons Convention banning the use of CS gas in warfare; apparently there is no prohibition on its use against American citizens.

A hazardous overdose could be created by the release of… even one full-sized grenade in a closed room.

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Compounding the terrors of this gas mixture is its potential for causing fire. One might as well toss gas on a fire. Janet Reno took the ultimate decision to allow the FBI to attack the compound and mass murder the civilians, based on what she stated was "hard intelligence" that "children were beaten". Further from the book: In fact, Child Protective Services officials, who immediately examined the kids who came out during the siege, uncovered no evidence of child abuse.

A Place Called Waco

Official lies survived the blaze intact. The agent, said the nurse, wanted to know how many casualties the unit could handle. Two other local hospitals were also approached by the FBI early that morning. As it turned out, the feds refused to pay for the treatment of our people in the Parkland burn unit, and the hospital administrator had to file a lawsuit against the agency to get the government to pay up.

Cyanide contraction is so violent it can break bones, which is why prison death-chamber officials who use the gas strap their victims down. The Israeli mother of my friend Pablo Cohen, herself a survivor of the Nazi death camps, said that never in her worst nightmares did she expect her son to die by gassing and incineration in America. I now realize that David Koresh made huge mistakes. He was guilty of statutory rape and slept with a number of women, among them Michele, who was fourteen at the time. In the end, 80 persons were slaughtered by an indifferent, wrong, and judging authority that received no penalties for their actions.

Still, due to how clearly the story is told, without any seeming want to seek pity or to disregard truths about the compound attack from both sides, as it were , this books is worthy of four out of five stars based on its sheer historical importance, reminding us to always keep watching the watchmen, be they leaders of cults or governments. Apr 03, Jane rated it liked it. Because Thibodeau's personal account of the Waco tragedy is divided into chapters of subject as opposed by chronological events, it makes it a difficult read for those who are looking for a series of timelines.

As people were introduced and then re-introduced throughout the book, I found myself looking at the Appendix where an account of those killed in February, those outside the compound in February, those killed in the final assault including the children and two stillborn , those who l Because Thibodeau's personal account of the Waco tragedy is divided into chapters of subject as opposed by chronological events, it makes it a difficult read for those who are looking for a series of timelines. As people were introduced and then re-introduced throughout the book, I found myself looking at the Appendix where an account of those killed in February, those outside the compound in February, those killed in the final assault including the children and two stillborn , those who left during the siege and those who survived the April 19 fire brought on by the FBI's tactics.

The best parts of the book are at the beginning where Thibodeau describes the final assault and near the end when he connects the pages of the final assault and what followed. Throughout the middle of the book Thibodeau does give a balanced account of his admiration of David Koresh and Koresh's knowledge of the Bible. However, it is more than extremely difficult for me to think that this was not a cult as 1 Koresh controlled everything--every decision, every marriage, every sexual act which only he could have , every dime made and spent, and every very morsel of food eaten, 2 Koresh encouraged the group's involvement in bars and drinking, which, in many circles are sinful acts, 3 Koresh thought himself to be "the lamb" and referred to himself as such on many occasions, and 4 Koresh had the group believing that only Koresh could interpret the Bible, including the seals as foretold in the book of Revelation.

While it is tragic that four federal officers died in the February assault, I did feel for those who survived the fire as I truly believe that the federal government performed illegal acts throughout the siege against the Mt. Carmel community and then held it against them at trial. Even the congressional hearings did not bring any federal agencies into accountability for their actions. The only person in the compound who should have been punished in a court of law was Koresh because of his illegal acts with underage minors--instead too many died because another false witness had a litany of sheep-like followers.

Mar 23, Debbie Smith rated it really liked it Shelves: Thibodeau shares his story of why he joined the community led by David Koresh and what went on inside the compound. I felt the author gave a very fair view of both sides. My rating of this book has nothin The author, David Thibodeau, is one of the few survivors of the raid in Waco, Texas, on April 19, Though non-fiction rarely finds its way to the top of my books to read, I'm glad this book made it there since I didn't follow the happenings at Waco too much at the time of the raid.

Aug 24, Meredith rated it it was amazing. For anyone who has any questions about what happened at Mt. Carmel this is a must read. I think David Thibodeau did a wonderful job. He was open and he was honest which is more than anyone in our government can claim about this case. To this day I am not sure what horrifies me the most, that our government could do such a thing and walk away virtually unscathed or how many people 25 years later have no idea what actually happened those fateful days in Waco Texas.

Jul 04, Mazola1 rated it really liked it. David Thibodeau was one of only 9 survivors of the federal government's attack on Mount Carmel, the Branch Davidian compound in Waco. Seventy four Davidians died, twenty one of them children. This attack followed a confrontation at Mount Carmel earlier in the year in which six Davidians and four government agents were killed. The FBI suspected the group of child abuse and stockpiling and dealing in illegal weapons. Its leader, the charismatic David Koresh, was portrayed in the media as a de David Thibodeau was one of only 9 survivors of the federal government's attack on Mount Carmel, the Branch Davidian compound in Waco.

Its leader, the charismatic David Koresh, was portrayed in the media as a demonic figure, a cult leader in the style of Jim Jones. Thibodeau had met Koresh in a chance encounter in a Hollywood guitar shop three years earlier, and eventually fell under his spell, and took up residence at Mount Carmel. Thibodeau also briefly sketches his path from a non-religious, unbeliever to a dyed-in-the wool true believer in Koresh's brand of fundamentalist Christianity. Maybe this is the type of thing that can never be described in a way that makes much sense to an outsider.

Although Thibodeau makes a valiant effort to explain the path he took, it still comes across as mysterious and even a bit weird. Maybe that's because the Davidian beliefs are so unconventional and out of the mainstream that they inevitably strike most people as odd and even weird. Koresh's Davidians were heavily into end of days, Book of Revelations, seven seals, apocalyptic teachings. His followers believed that Koresh was an inspired prophet and teacher who received revelations from God.

That's a little off the beaten path, but perhaps not that unusual.

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What really was unusual was Koresh's insistence that all male members of the group except himself were to be celibate, that only Koresh would father children, and that Koresh would and could sleep with any female member that he felt God told him to sleep with, including girls as young as twelve. Teachings such as these, and the tight control over the group that they reveal, marked the Davidians as a cult in the eyes of the media, the government and large segments of the surrounding populace and the American people.

It would certainly take an unusual relationship with a leader to induce young male believers to give up not only sex, but their children, their wives, and even their right to become parents. Thibodeau's book details the almost paranoid fear and mistrust that the group had for the government, and the media. They felt themselves to be despised and misunderstood by the government, and were sure that the government was out to exterminate them.

No doubt the story of Waco is a bit more complicated than Thibideau's book would have you believe, but it is hard to understand how the government could have used tanks, guns, tear gas and helicopters to attack a religious community where dozens of women and children lived, ostensibly, in part at least, to save the children from child abuse. The massive assault resulted in a wind whipped conflagration in which many children were burned to death.

The attack was ill-conceived and hasty, the degree of force used excessive, and the result both tragic and foreseeable. A Place Called Waco raises disturbing questions about the use of government force against groups such as the Davidians, and our society's uneasy relationship with groups that have unconventional beliefs. While freedom of religion surely does not encompass the right to molest children, the federal government's attack on Mount Carmel was brutal, excessive and at bottom, unnecessary.

The story of the seige of Mount Carmel is emblematic of the tensions inherent in a free society's attempt to extend freedom of religion to groups that have beliefs and practices that the majority considers to be odd or even abhorrent. In a way, that is one of the most difficult problems of any democracy -- how to respect and protect the rights of minorities while still maintaining a stable society and the rule of law. Most of the surviving Davidians were tried for the murder of the four government agents who died in the initial confrontation.

They were acquited of murder, but found guilty of lesser charges. The judge imposed the harshest sentences he could. The jury's reaction to the trial was instructive. The jurors were deeply divided. Some thought the government was guilty of outrageous murder, while others felt the Davidians were guilty of murder.

No one felt that they knew which side fired the first shot. The same could be said of the final attack. The truth is probably all but unknowable, as far as being able to determine what caused the fire, and how the Davidians died, whether by government action or their own hands. The whole situation could be summed up by what one juror said of the initial assault, "there were a lot of dirty hands out there on both sides.

He says that Koresh's death left a "black hole" in his life. With that having been said, the book is both a riveting inside look at the Davidians, Koresh and the Waco assault as well as an honest effort to undestand what happened at Waco. It's a thought provoking and important book. Mar 13, Melissa rated it it was amazing. I am so glad I read this book!!! That is so unbelievable to me. Sep 27, Jill Robbertze rated it liked it. I remembered the "Waco" tragedy but really didn't know much about the details so I found this book rather interesting.

I do sense that, besides the writer's account, there are other perspectives of what the Branch Davidians are all about and what really happened during the seige and final showdown. I found it hard to believe how the members were such faithful followers of David Koresh and his I remembered the "Waco" tragedy but really didn't know much about the details so I found this book rather interesting. I found it hard to believe how the members were such faithful followers of David Koresh and his "visions" even to the extent of the men remaining celebate while he was fathering multiple children with their wives and other women in the compound, some of which were under-aged girls.

I did find the last few chapters a bit repetitive and biased. Mar 12, Terry Tyler rated it liked it. After watching the excellent TV mini series, I had to read the book to find out more. The book begins with the end of the siege, in all its horror, then goes back to David Thibodeau's own story, about how he met David Koresh and ended up living with the Branch Davidians at Mount Carmel.

I liked that he is not all-believing about the visions and beliefs of Koresh; at no time did I feel he had been brainwashed by a cult leader, simply that he was a guy who'd always felt a bit of an outsider and was After watching the excellent TV mini series, I had to read the book to find out more. I liked that he is not all-believing about the visions and beliefs of Koresh; at no time did I feel he had been brainwashed by a cult leader, simply that he was a guy who'd always felt a bit of an outsider and was looking for some deeper meaning and somewhere to belong, like many who join these unorthodox religious communities.

He does not seem convinced that Koresh was, as per his own beliefs, the Lamb of the Fifth Seal mentioned in Revelations, but he valued his interpretation of the Scriptures and his teaching, generally. Thibodeau himself comments that the females 'chosen' for the honour of bearing Koresh's children just happened to be the more physically attractive women of the community. Okay, that's the scurrilous bit. There were also accusations of child abuse from those outside.

During the siege, some of the children were let out. Experts who cared for them said that they seemed happy, normal and properly looked after, and showed no signs of abuse whatsoever. The only crime committed appears to be Koresh's, of having sex with underage girls, but he's dead now, and has been for twenty-five years. Much of the book is taken up with the siege itself.

A Place Called Waco: A Survivor's Story by David Thibodeau

After a while the to-ings and fro-ings did feel a bit laboured, though I understand why Thibodeau felt it necessary to include every detail. When I got to his 'afterwards', when he was a guest on many TV shows and faced criticism from people who wanted only to believe the worst, I was not surprised that he took the opportunity in this book of making sure that everyone knew exactly what happened. It's a book that needed to be written, but to be honest I did find it a little boring in parts. Perhaps I shouldn't have watched the TV series, which was spectacularly good, first. I'm glad I read it, but I think it could have been chopped down in places to make it more compelling; as it was, I found myself skip-reading, whereas if it had been less dense I am sure I would have read all of it.

I've been reading other books about cults this summer I just finished Prophet's Prey and this was my first time reading a survivor's account. I left this book disgusted. Thibodeau provides an interesting perspective, but he is a fundamentally flawed narrator who seems to be truly unable to come to terms with Koresh's evil. How is it that it took well into the book for the author to even broach the fact that Koresh sexually assaulted children?

I'm neither American nor old enough to remember muc I've been reading other books about cults this summer I just finished Prophet's Prey and this was my first time reading a survivor's account. I'm neither American nor old enough to remember much about the cult, and so it astonished me that Thibodeau seemed to deliberately obscure Koresh's predilection for children and teenagers.

I learned a lot about Thibodeau's passion for the drums, Koresh's preaching about revelation and the seven seals, etc. How is this anything other than implying the consent of abused children who are legally and morally unable to consent? Thibodeau suggests that maybe it wasn't pedophilia but a self destructive bent that made Koresh assault children to hasten his conflict with the outside world. Is he actually trying to rationalize Koresh's pedophilia? Elsewhere Thibodeau critiques the testimony of those child survivors brave enough to testify about their abuse.

He writes, for example, that "Kiri told a dramatic - one might say melodramatic - tale of being sexually assaulted, but not penetrated, by David in a Texas motel when she was a mere ten years of age. This isn't a moral gray area. This isn't a question of religious freedom and government overreach. I will probably read other books on cults and maybe even others on Waco, but Waco: A Survivor's Story disgusted me - if Thibodeau isn't ready to condemn Koresh for child abuse, we as paying customers shouldn't continue to support him.

Jan 19, Kasey rated it really liked it Shelves: David Thibodeau never could have guessed that a chance meeting with a soft spoken and unassuming man in a L. Not a religious man by default, David came together with David Koresh through their mutual love of music. After months of impromptu bible study in which Koresh had presented his knowledge of the Seven Seals, David Tibodeau, with measured reluctance, made the decision to u David Thibodeau never could have guessed that a chance meeting with a soft spoken and unassuming man in a L.

After months of impromptu bible study in which Koresh had presented his knowledge of the Seven Seals, David Tibodeau, with measured reluctance, made the decision to uproot his life and move to Mount Carmel. The next few years were filled with bible study, hard work, releasing the ties of the material realm and self discovery. That is, until the apocalypse came. Thibodeau sets the record straight on a lot of things in this book, because he was there.

His testimony proves that most of the media propaganda surrounding Mount Carmel - the events leading up to, the Feb. What is revealed is the sobering reality of the brutality and prejudice the people of Mount Carmel suffered. The FBI and ATF's 'stop and nothing' tactics are sure to leave a sick feeling in your stomach and should serve as a constant reminder of what the powers that be can be capable of, and how the world views people with alternative beliefs. While the record reveals that David Koresh was not a completely innocent man, he was not the cult leader and brainwashing preacher the media led many to believe.

He did not think he was the second coming, and he didn't force his beliefs upon anyone. Everyone at Mount Carmel was free to pick up and leave whenever they pleased - both before AND during the stand off. However, Koresh's followers found his words to be truth, and as the US Government closed in around them, the teachings began to come true.

Not by their own actions, but through the actions of the United States Government. Pair this book with the documentary 'Waco: Rules of Engagement' and you've got the real deal, the real vision of Mount Carmel. Not the one the media presented, but the real people. May they all rest in peace.

We've heard for years, decades really, all of the bad things about David Koresh laced with loaded words like cult, compound, stockpiling, militant, child rape, etc. Well there are 2 sides to every story, and this book is the other side of the story, the side that you likely never heard of. Most of the complaints about We've heard for years, decades really, all of the bad things about David Koresh laced with loaded words like cult, compound, stockpiling, militant, child rape, etc.

Most of the complaints about this book is that it is biased. This is the story by an eyewitness on the inside of what really went on before, during and after the 51 day siege at Waco. While Koresh is always depicted in the media as a monster maybe justified, maybe not , the other 81 human beings who died at Mt Carmel were usually depicted as either innocent, tortured children or brainwashed followers. Intrigued and frustrated with a stalled music career, Thibodeau gradually became a follower and moved to the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas.

He remained there until April 19, , when the compound was stormed and burnt to the ground. In this book, Thibodeau explores why so many people came to believe that Koresh was truly divinely inspired. We meet the men, women and children of Mt. We get inside the day-to-day life of the community. Thibodeau is brutally honestabout himself, Koresh and the other membersand the result is a revelatory look at life inside a cult.

But A Place Called Waco is just as brutally honest when it comes to dissecting the actions of the United States government. Thibodeau marshals an array of evidence, some of it never previously revealed, and proves conclusively that it was our own government that caused the Waco tragedyincluding the fires. The result is a memoir that reads like a thrillereach page taking us closer to the eventual inferno.

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