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e-book The Sound of Butterflies

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You can, if you wish, select a specific area of the website to search by using the drop-down menu next to the search box. You can also narrow down your search after viewing the results. Set in the book follows the adventures of Thomas Edgar, collector of butterflies, during an expedition to the Amazon, the effects on him, of what happens there and how his wife, Sophie, deals with the changes in him on his return. This is a beautifully written book with vivid prose and some startling, apt but unusual imagery.

I like Piano Tuner a lot more.

Some part of the book was quite horrifying if I recall, since I read it about 3 years ago. Jo — I read The Piano Tuner a long time ago and can remember that it was beautifully written but incredibly slow. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. This entry was posted in Book reviews , New Zealand author.

Tracey November 20, at 6: JoV December 2, at Tracey December 3, at 5: Leave a Reply Cancel reply Enter your comment here All my favourite authors were there, from A. Milne and Michael Bond through to adult contemporary fiction, mysteries, thrillers, and classics I have loved. My husband asked me if this was in fact my secret hideaway, given it was exactly as I would have furnished I came across this gem on the bookshelves of the holiday home we rented this week.

My husband asked me if this was in fact my secret hideaway, given it was exactly as I would have furnished it, with my favourite types of art on the walls. As I scanned the shelves, Rachael King's 'The Sound of Butterflies' caught my eye, mostly because I 'know' Rachael from a Facebook authors' group and Twitter, but also because I was a little bit obsessed with butterflies as a child; it was set in an exotic location I am a sucker for exotic locations and, well, other Sue had read it so I should read it.

It didn't disappoint, and I spent a good deal of my holiday in the Amazon Basin, intrigued to find out what had made Thomas Edgar come home from his butterfly hunting expedition mute and terribly disturbed.

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It's a beautifully written page-turning mystery that eloquently describes the weirdness and horrors of life for both the Europeans and the Amazon Indians, in the rubber-boom years, when an opera house was built in the middle of the jungle, furs were imported from Europe, and horses drank from buckets of champagne. Rachael King's book is a unique read and highly recommended by me - and the other Sue, I feel. This sweet, deceptively simple novel touches on so many different themes and tropes, that reflecting on it, it is a marvel the author carried it all off, and did it so well.

The Sound of Butterflies is about manners and conventions, love, trust, and social justice cradled in the familiar narrative of the white man entering the jungle and succumbing to his most basic instincts. A lo-carb Heart of Darkness if you will. While the ending felt a little rushed and was wrapped up a little too nearly, t This sweet, deceptively simple novel touches on so many different themes and tropes, that reflecting on it, it is a marvel the author carried it all off, and did it so well. While the ending felt a little rushed and was wrapped up a little too nearly, the meat of the novel as told between jounal entries, letters and omniscient third person present point of view was enchanting.

Very much like the Amazonian rainforest where the book is set. Highly recommended for readers who like their novels with a touch of history. Mar 14, Lisa rated it really liked it. Good story- extremely violent and gory in some parts so not for everyone, but interesting to read about the rubber barons in Brazil and their financial connection to Europe. It is a story of the many physical and moral dilemmas a man must face while on a butterfly expedition in the Amazon in which render him mute upon his return to his wife, Sophie.

Through his journal entries and past letters, Sophie attempts to piece together what has happened to her beloved husband during his travels. Jun 04, Sarah Elhamy added it. Jan 08, Kristin Marchilena rated it did not like it. The characters in this book are not likable. Even the third-person omniscient narrator frustrated me. There were unnecessary gruesome details as well as a lot of missing details. The story was not compelling, and the way it unfolded was extremely predictable. Aug 02, Julie Christine rated it liked it Shelves: King is also the step-sister of a member of my then-book group.

The narrative- which moved between Victorian England and the wild, dangerous Amazonian jungle- flowed at good pace and the characters were well drawn, but I found the story and the themes it utterly derivative of AS Byatt. Rampant sex and violence, colonialism, the noble savage, homosexuality, infidelity, women's liberation, corporate greed, science, mental illness, tropical diseases- what more other than the kitchen sink could King have tossed into the mix? What suffers from this thematic potpourri is credibility and depth. But I would read a second novel by King- she's a good storyteller- to see if she can curb her enthusiasm and present a more carefully thought out but equally-entertaining yarn I was extremely disappointed with this book.

I really thought I was going to like it. I mean what's not to like about a scientific expedition into the Amazon? And the story was set up nicely. It starts off with the main character Thomas coming home to his wife from the Amazon very badly shocked. He is shocked in to silence.

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So I'm thinking maybe he got into some trouble with the locals. Maybe his life was in danger and he saw some and did some unspeakable things. I was mor I was extremely disappointed with this book. I was more than half way through with the book and all that had happened was view spoiler [ he slept with another man's wife! Plus I was getting really annoyed with how naive Thomas was. I just couldn't handle it.

Chapter Analysis of The Sound of Butterflies

This book left me feeling negative and annoyed. But that's just my opinion. And I guess I should also mention that my rating of 1 star is only because I "did not like it". It has nothing to do with the content, the writing, or the author.

The Sound of Butterflies

Apr 29, Alastair Crawford rated it it was amazing. Great page turner - every wilder thing that happened next was unpredictable but seemed set in concrete and unavoidably necessary not to mention convincing once it had occurred. Wee exceptions like Santos would have known Thomas was doing what he was doing, as he had spies and control Clever too with the readability - easy to follow despite the flowering plot lines and flashbacks and flash-forwards that kept the suspense.

Liked the cha Great page turner - every wilder thing that happened next was unpredictable but seemed set in concrete and unavoidably necessary not to mention convincing once it had occurred. Liked the characterisation of Agatha and how her non-conformity was important to Sophie. And loved the Fitzcaraldo-like setting in Brazil. Beautifully written too - looking forward to Magpie Hall. Nov 10, Susan rated it really liked it. Turn of the century English butterfly seeker in the Amazon. Books set in the Amazon are always so exotic and this one right up there.

Salvation at the end but a lot of strange goings-on in the middle. Dec 26, Angela marked it as to-read. Because Nenia loved it. Jun 22, Bachyboy rated it really liked it. This is a nicely crafted book alternating between the present and Thomas's story. He has returned from the Amazon hunting his elusive butterfly and his wife is dismayed at his silence.

Aug 02, Div rated it really liked it. I'll avoid reiterating the premise of this book, since I assume most people here have already read the synopsis. The characters are fleshed out. Th I'll avoid reiterating the premise of this book, since I assume most people here have already read the synopsis. There is even detail put into characters that never appear and play no part in the actual plot.

Not to the point of dredging the reader down with details, but rather creating a world that feels real and has real consequences. The friendships felt real. The way the characters reacted to one another felt real. The less pleasant characters still won my interest. And even when the pleasant characters were revealed to have done not so pleasant things, I worried on their behalf. I was initially going to give this book 5 stars, but I'll admit the ending left me disappointed. An entire book of tension ultimately led to a brief chapter of tragedy that was promptly swept in favor of an undeserved resolution.

I would have preferred the story to end of an unsettling note, something that lingers in my mind for the next few days. Instead, by the time I closed the book I had already removed myself from the story. Mar 15, Jan rated it liked it. I loved the idea of the butterflies working as a metaphor, but the idea was never fully developed. This book took me awhile to get into and I found it slow reading. The book begins with Sophie receiving a letter from her young husband, Thomas Edgar as he is in Brazil collecting butterflies.

We are introduced right off to the beautif I loved the idea of the butterflies working as a metaphor, but the idea was never fully developed. And it seems somehow each of these characters represents more than just themselves. Where are you in them? Where are any of us? For me, it is there but remains like the notion of the sound of butterflies vague.

Thomas arrives home mute.

The Sound of Butterflies

The back of the book says that Sophie tries to help her husband by searching through the belongings he bought home. But they were soon hidden from her. So to me it was a disconnect.