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Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential. Learn how we rate. For Your Family Log in Sign me up. Reviews Find the good stuff, faster — from books to YouTube. YouTube channel reviews are here! The best media for your family, hand-picked by our editors.

What's on your mind? Get answers to top parenting questions here. Newbery Honor book is a fun mystery romp. Zilpha Keatley Snyder Mystery Sign in or join to save for later. Based on 5 reviews. Based on 19 reviews. Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization. Your purchase helps us remain independent and ad-free. Get it now on Searching for streaming and purchasing options A lot or a little? The parents' guide to what's in this book. In this book the kids are still in the "Ewww There is nothing in this book harsher than a "Sheesh!

As April is climbing in through the hole in the fence, someone grabs her from behind. Yeah, you saw that coming. She struggles to say something, but both she and Marshall are scared speechless. Then she hears someone yelling for help, and the attacker lets her go and runs away. Later on, they learn that the Professor is the one who saw her being attacked and yelled for help. Oh—turns out he's not such a scary old man, after all. Anyone else see some Boo Radley inspiration here? And Marshall is able to successfully identify the murderer, who works at a local store.

In the end, Marshall is hailed as a hero, and so is the Professor. The Professor's business takes off and he stops by on Christmas Eve to give all the children keys to the yard so that they can continue to play their game. Plus, April has decided to stay with her grandmother permanently, and is happily settled into her new life. The book closes with Melanie and April discussing gypsies…which might just be their next game. Oh boy, another culture to take things from—and hopefully learn from, too.

Let's just hope there're no murderers this time around. Everything sound a little too perfect and happy so far? Okay, time for a little plot twist.

The Egypt Game

Uh, that's a little creepy. Almost as creepy as a stuffed octopus. It's nice when a childhood favourite holds up decades later. I read this book several times in elementary school when it first came out, and when I started seventh grade I was thrilled to see a huge section of books on Egypt in the highschool library. I proceeded to read a lot of them! Coming back to this book 4 decades later, I noticed a whole plot thread that had zipped over my innocent little head back then.

How did I miss the whole serial-child-killer scare that keeps the kids indoors for wee It's nice when a childhood favourite holds up decades later. How did I miss the whole serial-child-killer scare that keeps the kids indoors for weeks? Maybe I was more caught up in their imagination games. In a time when two year olds can handle their parents' tablets and smartphones to watch cartoons or play Angry Birds, I wonder if today's kids could create their own worlds like this, with only an empty lot to play in.

No, I'm not being snarky; I'm curious. Snyder repeats a motif from many of her books: I just learned this book is banned in several places.

And yet they let their kids watch TV or go online and find much worse stuff. It was interesting how the kids created their own ceremonies etc. I bet that's how the original Egyptians got started, on a different level. Yeah, let's try that. Feb 28, jess rated it really liked it Shelves: I loved this book as a kid. I recently learned there's a sequel, so I decided to re-read the Egypt Game before I read the sequel.

I was worried that it wouldn't hold up to my childhood memories. I was especially concerned that the way the kids treat different cultures might come across as flat or awkward or, frankly, xenophobic or bigoted. I'm a lot more sensitive about that stuff these days. And the group of kids themselves are pretty diverse, right? Anyway, things I love about this book: I'm so glad I re-read it.

The Egypt Game Summary

I think the magic survived the test of time. Dec 05, Carleigh rated it liked it Shelves: Nov 22, Nany rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Stephanie, but she already read it! When I started reading it, which was on my summer vacations, I liked it so much, I couldn't stop reading it. I think I read it in two days. It's so fantastic, how April, Melanie, Marshal, and then Elizabeth, and the two boys Toby and Ken create a society, which grows and grows. This book felt so magic. I spent like 15 min. It's magic how the author can combine styles and topics, and make an "epic" book, counting that the kid's society was about Ancient Egypt, which really interests me.

It's great how the author makes such a mysterious character called "The Professor" by the kids, and then he presents his character as a mature adult that has a truly sad story, but he learns how to go in front by watching little kids play such a beautiful and creative game. I also loved the end, when April, my favorite character asks Melanie, who is also such a great character, if she wants to learn about something else. I just love this book, and I gave it 5 stars because it's the best book I've ever read. Mar 14, Brett rated it really liked it Shelves: I loved this book so much back in like fourth grade.

Highly recommended for middle-grade readers. Feb 01, Margo Littell rated it really liked it. I loved this back then and I loved it now. Nov 30, Jennifer rated it it was ok. I recall a teacher reading this book, but couldn't quite remember much else. I love Egypt and everything that comes with it. It's a unique culture from a different time, filled with pharaohs, pyramids, and mummies. And the children in this story are equally enthralled with Egyptology. They go to the library to research it, role play pharaohs, gods, and servants.

They even play Egyptians for Halloween. But, while they are having fun The children's I recall a teacher reading this book, but couldn't quite remember much else. The children's parents don't allow them to play outside as much, for fear of having their children killed. But, children know how to sneak out of their rooms at night.

Will all of the children stay safe? Read this book to find out. Unfortunately, this book doesn't appeal to me much after the first two chapters.

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It's filled with the children role-playing. And, the 20 children who went to my library's book club agreed. A book related to ancient Egyptian culture would have been more appealing if they were time-traveling to Egypt or perhaps a book about children who lived in ancient Egypt. But, a book about kids playing doesn't cut it. If the author chose to play off of the murders more, it could have a different excitement entirely. Perhaps taking that route would have been too scary?

Not everyone agrees with me though, this book was awarded the Newbery Honor around Sep 25, Gabby rated it it was amazing. In a university town in California, two sixth grade girls named Melanie and April came up with a great idea: Together, they built temples out of cardboard boxes and used various materials to make gods and goddesses. They even got pieces of clothing and unused jewelry to make Egyptian costumes. When they started asking their In a university town in California, two sixth grade girls named Melanie and April came up with a great idea: When they started asking their oracle questions, something fishy happened: It seemed to answer them by itself.

The children asked more questions and it kept doing the same thing. During an investigation, the police arrested a young man who worked as a stockboy. But instead of sending him to trial, he was taken to the hospital because he was mentally ill. After all of this was over, the children had to clean up what they made and stayed indoors to be safe.

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This story was so interesting. I think that it would be a fun game to play. I also think that this is a good book to read, to learn some things about ancient Egypt.

The Egypt Game-4

Feb 14, Kathleen rated it it was ok Shelves: First published in , this book was written around the time I was the same age as the youngest member of the characters. It was awarded a Newbery Honor in its day and I think I can figure out why. It features a cast of characters that is diverse, and a neighborhood that is a little run down and seedy, and single mothers and grandmothers raising their children. Coming off the s Leave It to Beaver Generation, this book would have seemed pretty edgy. I think it doesn't play as well with cur First published in , this book was written around the time I was the same age as the youngest member of the characters.

I think it doesn't play as well with current audiences, however. The first half of the book moves way too slowly and there is the question of children being allowed to run wild all day without any parental supervision. Will kids buy it? I don't understand the reviews that say this is banned book. I can't think of anything in it that is ban-worthy, except some people might think that children shouldn't be playing at worshipping Egyptian gods and goddesses.

But it is clearly a child's pretend game, and does speak to a child's imagination being more entertaining than basketball or television. So many layers - family issues, friendships, imagination, social issues, and creepy suspense. April was such a great character, reacting to feeling abandoned by her mother with her creative use of false eyelashes. Thank goodness Melanie was her friend, and didn't let April wear those eyelashes to school! I love all the details about the game, with everyone using their imaginations to recreate an Egyptian temple and all the rituals. All the relationships between the kids are so funny Great book!

All the relationships between the kids are so funny and true. According to the forward in the new paperback edition, Snyder based all the characters on real kids she knew when she was working as a teacher, and it shows in how well all the characters are depicted. I love this book! May 05, Namitha Varma rated it liked it Shelves: An enjoyable story, though I wish I read this at least 20 years earlier. It'd have given my imagination a great boost if I'd read it in my childhood. However, this reminded me of the "pretend games" I myself used to play - apart from the house game where I'd be the mother or the daughter or the sister - especially the one that involved a whole universe of uber-tiny people who lived inside walls and wood which I imagined to be hollow inside for these people to populate , and one of them, Libu, w An enjoyable story, though I wish I read this at least 20 years earlier.

However, this reminded me of the "pretend games" I myself used to play - apart from the house game where I'd be the mother or the daughter or the sister - especially the one that involved a whole universe of uber-tiny people who lived inside walls and wood which I imagined to be hollow inside for these people to populate , and one of them, Libu, was my friend. I especially liked the ending, even if certain parts of the book were hardly extraordinary.