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Do I feel some of the movers were a little too inaccessible? But still, it's Ambrose. As for the art, I thi I will admit this story could have used some refining. As for the art, I think this is some of Buckingham's weaker work. Which is unfortunate because I normally so enjoy Buckingham's art. But there were some drawings, of Beast especially where it looked like Buckingham was just burned out. The give-the-man-a-break issue was more enjoyable than usual. But it revolved around the cubs, so I shouldn't be surprised.

But the art was also better or at least something I enjoyed more than a lot of the regular stand-ins. I think Fables got bigger than Willingham and its best days may be behind it. But it is still more fun than a lot of the things out there. It will be interesting to see how the war goes. Jul 05, Jen rated it it was amazing Shelves: I love this series with all of my little heart.

Bringing old fable and fairy-tale characters into a modern-day setting in our world, united by a threat to their Homelands, I think the series is utterly brilliant and creative. This particular volume focuses on a character who has previously been mostly in the background. Flycatcher, known to most of us as the Frog Prince, takes on a central role in this book and finds his strength to fulfill his destiny. Which is, essentially, being an undefeatab I love this series with all of my little heart.

Which is, essentially, being an undefeatable thorn in the side of the Adversary, who wastes a large number of troops trying to defeat Fly in his kingdom. A lot of his troops desert and join Fly's kingdom because he is a caring, forgiving, fair and kind ruler - like a drink of cool water after working for the Adversary. The whole story sets the stage for the coming war between the Adversary and the Fables we know and love I think I liked this book even more than the others because it was so great to see Fly finally confront and resolve his issues from the past and become comfortable in himself.

Fables Vol. 10: The Good Prince

Oct 07, Derek rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: I stopped reading Fables in the singles format a long time ago. The way the stories are constructed it just made more sense to read them all at once. However, after I made that decision I just never got around to picking up any of the trades.

When I got a bit of extra money I bought it and was blown away by the story. I loved the way that Willingham took a minor character who was little more t I stopped reading Fables in the singles format a long time ago. I loved the way that Willingham took a minor character who was little more than background imagery when I was reading the book regularly and turned him into a major character.

I was surprised by how much I liked the story. It is not totally without flaws, unfortunately. There is an interlude with a story about the children of Snow White and The Big Bad Wolf which was totally different in tone and to top it off they had a different artist. I could have done without that particular chapter, but I am thinking that it was added to set something up for the overall storyline. I think that this was a really strong story and it has whet my appetite for the next volume.

Jun 26, Angela Oliver rated it really liked it. Perhaps not the most climactic conclusion but a delightful story about a character I've grown rather fond of. Jan 12, Jack rated it liked it Shelves: It's been a long time since I've had a freshly unread Fables trade and I was really looking forward to reading this. Sadly it wasn't all that great, but just good enough to keep me interested in reading this series when I can get them from the library.

Fables, Vol. 10: The Good Prince

Flycatcher -- always a bumbling, comical sort of character -- has just realized that he was a prince in the Homelands and that his family was killed horribly. After the spirit of Lancelot which had been hanging around Fabletown all this time -- It's been a long time since I've had a freshly unread Fables trade and I was really looking forward to reading this. After the spirit of Lancelot which had been hanging around Fabletown all this time -- who knew? The good guys win. I really liked the idea of this story -- it just, you know, wasn't that good.

Turning Fly into a brave and noble prince was a nice move, but we never really got to see the transition. There was also never a lick of danger or risk to be felt in Fly's confrontations with the legions of the Adversary's forces. Rather, a feeling of inevitability carried the forces of good to victory, dealing a massive blow against the Adversary. Y'know, it seems like the Adversary has had his ass handed to him so many times in this series, each defeat more crushing than the last, that he's stopped looking like much of a threat!

And now the Fables have been stockpiling modern conventional weapons for the shooting war that takes place in the next trade, so they drop a couple A-bombs on him and that's that, right? I mean, it seems like that's where this is headed. The point is, this series has always worked best when it focuses on the lives of the Fables, rather than on the conflict with the Adversary, because the Fables always win their battles too handily.

If Willingham wants me to keep reading, he better raise the stakes something fierce in the next storyline. On one hand, All out secret war preparations of both Fabletown and the Empire: Battle plannings, spy games, political maneuvers, subterfuge upon subterfuge, sniper training, commando training, arms and ammunition gathering. And on the other hand, a transformed and awakened from years of memory loss hero's journey through the living and the dead, beyond the underworlds and death, and above magical worlds and life, facing countless battles using his magical powers to his true destiny.

A frog who On one hand, All out secret war preparations of both Fabletown and the Empire: A frog who turned into a prince; who then lost his family, kingdom, people and memory; for centuries survived as a lowly humble amnesiac janitor in the Fabletown community, then one day suddenly recollects his lost memories and reborn as the true and rightful king with magical powers and visions; began a long and hard quest commanding a kickass ghost army, wearing a magical armor of Lancelot and wielding the Excalibur of King Arthur, in path of creating his own free kingdom at the heart of the evil Empire; and vanquished that Empire's most powerful and strongest forces to expand it regularly; finally achieving the impossible vision he set out to fulfill.

Epic can't even begin to describe it. Did I mention this series is addictive and awesome? Sep 25, Tim Ludwikowski rated it it was amazing. I've been on a run of reading volumes and so far I haven't found one that isn't a joy to read! I think I've found my next "required reading" comic!

Apr 09, Alex Andrasik rated it it was amazing Shelves: Fables goes full-on mythic, demonstrating that the legendary aura of certain characters continue to develop even in their mundane exile, as a humbled prince becomes imbued with fantastic, transcendent powers and takes the fight against the Adversary back to the Homelands.

I realized what bothers me about this series, though when it bothers me.

Fables Vol. The Good Prince - Comics by comiXology

I know the old text-box has been in decline in comics--nothing modern cab match the voluble verbosity of Stan the Man Lee--but Wil Fables goes full-on mythic, demonstrating that the legendary aura of certain characters continue to develop even in their mundane exile, as a humbled prince becomes imbued with fantastic, transcendent powers and takes the fight against the Adversary back to the Homelands. I know the old text-box has been in decline in comics--nothing modern cab match the voluble verbosity of Stan the Man Lee--but Willingham really leaves us hanging throughout most of Fables.

What expository notes there are are bare and blunt--almost brutal statements of time and location. There's no lyricality to it--and exposition is where musical language flourishes, usually, there being little practical place for it in dialogue that's intended to be realistic. This volume avoids that problem because its mythic register elevates even common speech--but most slice-of-life segments of the series suffer from this denuded language, even when the conflicts and character development are of interest.

Anyway, just an observation. Jul 16, Nihal Vrana rated it liked it. I started to lose interest in this series, and the overtly militaristic undertones started to irk me. I have never liked this post-modernist mish-mash stories where you take a bit from here and bit from there to say something clever and end up mostly re-iterating what the original material has already said.

There is an inherent futility in this kind of work. This one was a rather good example but the material in it is not strong enough to hold hundreds of issues honestly. I think that I will I started to lose interest in this series, and the overtly militaristic undertones started to irk me. I think that I will stop here. Mar 27, Jessica Mendes rated it liked it Shelves: Sep 10, Scott rated it really liked it.

In the Library of Graphic Literature #14

Mar 22, Stefan Grainger rated it it was amazing. Sometimes, the most unassuming of characters have the greatest of stories. I knew that Flycatcher was the frog prince, but seeing him transition from lowly janitor to highest king was one of the best arcs in Fables. And the way he handled thing was masterfully done! Jan 25, zackxdig rated it really liked it Shelves: Flycatcher wins a war without shedding any blood while he builds up his kingdom and turns the wooden soldier army into a forest.

Jun 01, Danna rated it really liked it. Though I still have many on my "currently reading" list that I need to finish, I've had a lovely Sunday afternoon reading comics with my feller. For him, each issue is a snack to be savored until the next issue comes out. I would rather wait until at least one story arc is complete, then read a bunch of issues in one sitting so it feels more like a complete novella or at least a short story instead of just a few teaser pages at a time. Before starting my goodreads profile I'd already read thro Though I still have many on my "currently reading" list that I need to finish, I've had a lovely Sunday afternoon reading comics with my feller.

About Fables in general: It doesn't take itself too seriously ie: Though it's focus is on the Fables from Western traditions who are living in America, they describe other Fable lands representing all of the various world cultures, and there's a whole story arc involving the Arabian Fables issues including a great supplimental graphic novel, Nights of Snowfall, in which Snow White finds herself playing the role of Scheherazade. They take a broad view of what constitutes a "Fable" which I appreciate; for example, they include characters outside of the oral tradition, who can be attributed to a specific author like Mowgli from The Jungle Book, and characters from historical mythology like Sir Lancelot.

They also convincingly encapsulate recurring archetypes like The Big Bad Wolf, Prince Charming, and the ubiquitous Jack into single characters. Jack spun off into his own series, Jack of Fables, which I will also catch up with one of these days. And of course the illustrations are very detailed and well done, especially the cover art and the borders within the pages. It's a great medium; I just find that in this series, there isn't as much critical storytelling residing soley in the illustrations as there can be in other series, so I don't pay attention to it as closely as I do the words.

Fun stuff, and highly recommended. Apr 10, Grace rated it it was amazing. The best volume of Fables yet, this trade paperback recounts the story of Ambrose, aka "Flycatcher. Ambrose met his princess wife, was married, became king, and had children. However, when he is confronted with extreme emotion, fear, etc Ambrose someti The best volume of Fables yet, this trade paperback recounts the story of Ambrose, aka "Flycatcher. However, when he is confronted with extreme emotion, fear, etc Ambrose sometimes tends to accidentally slip back into his frog form.

When the Adversary began conquering his kingdom, Ambrose succumbed to fear, and slipped into frog form, having to helplessly watch his entire family die at the hands of the invading army. When Ambrose came to Fabletown a haven for all in New York City , he had lost all memory of what had happened, and all of the other Fables swore to never tell him. He became the custodian, cleaning after others to endlessly atone for vaguely-phrased wrongs they claimed he had committed in order to keep him distracted In reality, Ambrose is the one and only Fable who came to Fabletown with no sins to be absolved.

He is the only completely pure-of-heart Fable. This is all just back story to this volume, in which Ambrose finally remembers what happened to him, and finds an outlet for his emotions. Finally, this volume of Fables begins to pick up the pace I had complained that previous volumes were just getting way too slow in the overall conflict between the Fables and the Adversary. Ambrose's story is one of the best told from the entire series, and I'd rank this volume very high, perhaps at the very top, of the volumes thus far.

Aug 19, Shannon rated it did not like it Shelves: I can't say how much I'm disappointed by this volume. After 'Sons of Empire', I felt like things were looking up, but this wasn't what I was expecting. There were a few scenes I really enjoyed. I liked seeing Bigby prepping the armies. I was especially impressed with how Charming handled himself. I was honestly surprised by him because I had become convinced he was a complete failure at being mayor. Those were a few bright spots in this. However, for the most part, I was bored to tears. It was m I can't say how much I'm disappointed by this volume.

It was more interesting to read about the Fables preparing for war than Flycatcher's corny journey to avenge his family or whatever. Having seen Blue's fun adventure through the Homelands, this paled in comparison. My biggest problem was that I just didn't care about Flycatcher. I didn't like the turn his character took. He became a bit cardboard cutout like. I seriously wanted to punch someone at how easily things went for him. Of course, I'm always rooting for the fables to prevail, but it's so dull watching everything go as planned.


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I'd rather read about a character that gets cut down than one that Gary Stu's it up and craps rainbows with everyone bowing before him like he's god or something. I truly love this series, so that's why I'm coming down so hard on it. The ending of this volume has me seriously confused for how the rest of the books will play out. The Adversary pretty much got their asses handed to them. They might as well not even have a war anymore with how easily Flycatcher dealt with them. I'll read the next one though. Hopefully, the next volume will be loads better and this was just one of the dips in the series.

Jan 26, Jelinas rated it it was amazing. Boy, oh, boy, was this a good one. In Sons of Empire , we learned that Ambrose, also known as Flycatcher, better known to us mundys as the Frog Prince, was destined for an important future. The Good Prince tells the tale of Ambrose's realization of his fate. We take a trip down the Witching Well, and are reunited with characters that we thought were dead and gone from as far back as Volume 2, Animal Farm.

I mean, Ten bound volumes, plus those Jack extras, etc. It keeps me involved and interested and delighted. While the critique that this one is not sufficiently involved with evolving characterization rings true, we nevertheless get some revelations, we get a fun plot with a twist, we get a bit of humor, and we get a trip down to the Witching Well which, come on, weren't you curious? This installment, which harkens more to a traditional hero's journey, a more traditional fable, in this case, Flycatcher's redemptive journey, fills that bill nicely.

We see tormented Flycatcher take the reins of his destiny--and, naturally, magic is afoot. His journey twines with that of the Forsworn Knight another recurring background character who has been tickling curiosity out of me from the start. The two find a way to heal wounds, make amends, and do good. It will affect both the exiles and the homelanders. It's certainly gonna tick off the Big Baddie puppetmaker. Characterization quibbles aside, and even the complaint that this too easily solves a great portion of the war build-upwell, I'm gonna give the writers credit that they'll find a way to up the stakes, despite what happens here.

This is a story of redemptions, heroism, self-sacrifice, and reaping the rewards of virtue or the just desserts of baddieness. It's got a happy ending which I love , and it gives a message of seeking ways other than traditional warfare to bring a resolution at least in part and solve problems for the greater community. That's a good lesson. Although, naturally, it's easier done when one has magical armor, Excalibur, and a band of special fighters not limited to traditional means.

Okay, so maybe that does dilute the pacifistic point. There's even a nifty ecological message in the climactic battle. I love this series. Can't wait to get 11 to add to my collection. Now, as the end caption of issue 60 reads: Third time's a charm. Except that he doesn't do this single-handedly. Catching up on this amazing title, for those who need it: FABLES scribe Bill Willingham imagines characters from myth, folklore, and fairy tales as real people who long ago were driven from their Homelands by the monstrous Emperor.

These days, these folks live among us, inhabiting a piece of Manhattan's Upper West Side even as they hide their true nature from us. As we come up to this story arc, things have come to a head between these denizens of Fabletown and the Emperor. The stench of war taints the air - or maybe it's just smog, I dunno. If you're at all any fan of Flycatcher, then you're gonna soar to the moon because he becomes the central character for a good while.

We don't know too much of him, other than he's the Frog Prince of the famous fairy tale, but that he's lost the awful memories of his family being slaughtered. In Fabletown, this unassuming guy's been reduced to perennial custodial status, thanks largely to Bigby, who was looking out for him there's a good reason. And, so, after weeks of near catatonic despondency and after some straightening out by Ride and his best friend Boy Blue, Fly finally sets out to do big things in memory of his massacred family.

By the time Flycatcher's epic story concludes, he'll have gained a haunted kingdom and played a key role in Fabletown's upcoming struggle against the Emperor and the Homelands. Working thru a kind of magical intuition, Flycatcher gathers a curious assembly to him, comprising in part of characters we thought we'd never see again.

Fables Vol. 10: The Good Prince (Fables (Graphic Novels)) - download pdf or read online

His right hand man is a once glorious knight in need of redemption that enough of a clue? Two deceased Fabletown villains return, as well as a recent traitor. Flycatcher begins his quest with a harrowing journey thru the dead lands within the Wishing Well, this being the path he chooses to return to the Homelands.

Once there, he means to establish a kingdom, as a refuge for those subjects unwilling to live under the Adversary's iron rule. This act of rebellion doesn't at all pass unnoticed, and so very soon the Emperor is deploying various armies to Flycatcher's tiny kingdom of Haven. Except that Flycatcher doesn't believe in the brutality and horror of war. Even though he now wields the legendary sword in the stone. He finds another way. This story also marks the children at last finding out about their invisible brother, Ghost. Aaron Alexovich's cute, lighthearted artwork definitely shifts away from the solemn mood of Fly's storyline.

Meanwhile, Prince Charming and his inner circle have learned of the Emperor's intent to war with Fabletown. And, so, Willingham also presents cutaway segments devoted to Fabletown as it girds for war, with its residents undertaking various combat training including sniper school. This is a really terrific read. There's a richness and depth here which is rarely found in other comic book titles. Guy makes you care for his cast of characters. He's so good at this that he had me totally absorbed with Flycatcher, that odd, formerly negligible dude with the mop and the frog cap.

Also engrossing are the passages which dwell on Fabletown's gearing up for war, the meticulous plannings and the meetings that went into it. Meantime, longtime workhorses and respective penciller and inker Mark Buckingham and Steve Leialoha not only provide continuity in the visuals but, as a bonus, this trade also reproduces James Jean's fabulously ethereal covers to this run of FABLES. One very intriguing tongue-in-cheek aspect in all this is Fly's asking the magic mirror to keep his friends apprised of his doings.

This results in Fly's exploits suddenly becoming a must-see TV event for the Fabletown community - Willingham's pretty cool nudge at the ribs at reality television. I love the coda, which has Fly donning his old hat for old times' sake - a moment of respite to go out on, as the big bad war looms over the fables. One person found this helpful.

Even better than its predecessors! Focusing almost exclusively on Ambrose's Flycatcher's reaction to the loss of his family, from which he bounces back impressively, this addition to the series sort of comes out of nowhere. Still, it is pleasing in nearly every way. Not only is this a feel-good, action-packed, fun-to-read story, it is also one of the most stand alone and complete sub-plots of the series.

You aren't left wondering what happens next with this one, even though the future of the series really seems ready to take off as the Fables gear up for the 'shooting war' with the Adversary. If you haven't reached this point in the series yet, you're in for a pleasant experience. Take a peek down the Witching Well and re-learn why you love this series so much! See all 58 reviews. See all customer images. Most recent customer reviews. Published 3 months ago. Published 10 months ago.

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